Valse Gisele

  1. Christian DP
    Christian DP
    Another waltz from the repertoire of the Ottawa Ceili Band, this time a French Canadian one composed by Yvon Cuillerier, who passed away last year.
  2. Martin Jonas
    Martin Jonas
    Very nice, Christian! I especially like the B part of the tune, although it sounds quite tricky to play. I thought I had played through all the waltzes on Alf's site, but I don't remember this one.

    Martin
  3. Frithjof
    Frithjof
    You found a beautiful waltz and recorded it with a sweat tone, Christian.
  4. Sherry Cadenhead
    Sherry Cadenhead
    Really lovely.
  5. John Kelly
    John Kelly
    Another fine offering, Christian.
  6. Christian DP
    Christian DP
    Thanks folks! Martin, you can find the sheet music here:http://www.alfwarnock.info/ocb/waltz08.pdf
    And a big welcome to Sherry for joining this nice community.
  7. Sherry Cadenhead
    Sherry Cadenhead
    Thanks, Christian. I happened onto "Humphreys Waltz " and couldn't resist printing the notation. I made the mistake of showing it to my teacher, who insists I not record it without the variations. One more thing to learn! Ugh!
  8. JL277z
    JL277z
    Christian, you play a very lovely version of Valse Gisele! And thanks for the sheet music, good to see the chord names too.


    Sherry wrote: "I happened onto "Humphreys Waltz" and couldn't resist printing the notation. I made the mistake of showing it to my teacher, who insists I not record it without the variations. One more thing to learn! Ugh!"

    Sherry, welcome! I have to respectfully disagree with that teacher though. The variations/ornaments provide ideas as to options to explore at your leisure when/if you feel like it later at some point. But don't worry about those to start with, on a new tune that you're just learning. Most musicians aren't going to play a tune's ornaments the exact same way every time through a tune anyway, so there's no point in memorizing every little detail or trying to play everything exactly "as written" because what's written merely represents one way of many ways to play it. So... recommend to start with the basic melody. It's a beautiful melody even in its most basic form, even without any ornaments. As you become more comfortable with any tune, you'll eventually find yourself adding your own personal touches along the way (this is a *good* thing - it's not like classical or something where such customizations seem to be discouraged), without even having to consciously be aware of it, it will 'just happen' and some of such customizations will likely sound pretty darn nice. Meanwhile, recommend to not stress out about trying to play a transcript exactly as written in every finest detail because that's not required nor even necessarily optimal. After all, as to Humphreys Waltz that you mentioned, the composer (Daniel Nestlerode) wrote, on April 25th in the Humphreys thread:

    "... keep it simple and not worry about triplets or embellishments. My philosophy about fiddle tunes is to make them personal; catch the corners properly, but play what seems to fit best under my fingers and in my mind on the straightaways. After all, it's folk music!"

    Right on!
Results 1 to 8 of 8