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Thread: Tenor Guitar/Banjo Players

  1. #26
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    Default Re: Tenor Guitar/Banjo Players

    I think those D'addario Irish Tenor Banjo strings work better on a Plectrum Banjo cause the longer scale length pulls them a little tighter. The John Pearse Strings (the John Pearse #450s double as Ball End Strings for if you have a Terminator Tailpiece that accepts both loop & ball end strings) are better balanced so they sound better too.

  2. #27
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    Default Re: Tenor Guitar/Banjo Players

    Quote Originally Posted by bruce.b View Post
    GDAE on both. I first found out about tenor banjos and tenor guitars from Irish trad players and they were all tuned GDAE so that's what I used. It was only when I researched them that I found out CGDA was the original tuning. For Irish and fiddle tunes I think GDAE makes a lot more sense and it also gives you a more useful range. I love playing tunes that stay on the two lower strings a lot and seek them out. I tend to often use the G string for harmony on the tunes that don't go down there. I'm not sure what tuning I'd prefer if I started with CGDA, perhaps that would then feel and sound best to me.

    I know a lot of people coming from Ukulele are using DGBE so they can use the same chord shapes. Makes sense, and tenor guitars do sound nice tuned that way.

    I just got a Kala tenor and I'm leaving that in CGDA for now. I doubt I'd be happy with it tuned GDAE as the body is really small and there's no way the G string is going to sound great, IMO. Plus, there would be no reason to ever play it if it was tuned the same as my "good" tenor, except maybe as a travel guitar. I'm getting it set up this coming week to lower the strings at both the nut and saddle. It's been fun playing it in the high tuning even with the high setup that pulls it slightly out of tune.
    I use GDAE for Jazz cause it gives the Guitar a much deeper & mellower sound:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kG9L...KZP3UKDKrLcrA8 also Tenor Guitars tend to have a Deeper body to help that Low G speak more clearly.

  3. #28
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    Default Re: Tenor Guitar/Banjo Players

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is a Harmony H1215T Archtop Tenor Guitar & it has a 16 in lower bout which means it can better handle those low notes in GDAE Tuning. John Pearse #450 Strings for GDAE Tuning actually sound great for Jazz cause it's a much deeper & mellower sound. Even w/ the Small bodied Tenors they tend to have a deeper body to help those low notes speak better, add a Pickup to them & plug them into an amp, they really come to life. Also the pickup allows you to use FX Pedals.

  4. #29

    Default Re: Tenor Guitar/Banjo Players

    Necrobump of three posts in a row, but only *two* pushing that brand of strings! Might be losing that touch....
    ----

    Playing a funky oval-hole scroll-body mandolin, several mandolins retuned to CGDA, three CGDA-tuned Flatiron mandolas, two Flatiron mandolas tuned as octave mandolins,and a six-course 25.5" scale CGDAEB-tuned Ovation Mandophone.

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  6. #30
    Registered User lowtone2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tenor Guitar/Banjo Players

    If y'all are unaware of it, Tristan Scroggins cut an album of solo tenor banjo pieces.





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