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Thread: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

  1. #26
    Registered User withfoam's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Quote Originally Posted by MitchStein View Post
    I don't see Weber being discussed in this convo, where I thought I would.any opinions?
    Funny you mention Weber, I was wondering the same thing. Wasn't sure if their top tier is worth anything.

  2. #27
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Am in the group that once you get into that price range, you should figure out what you want and how best to achieve it. There are a lot of choices in that price range. A Lloyd LaPlant is probably out of your range, but that would be one I would think of first. Then again I am biased in that a number of friends play his instruments.

    Others have suggested a fine list. There is Campanella at The Music Emporium that would probably be a final instrument for many. Not sure what Austin Clarke is charging, but one of those might also be a final choice. A good friend plays one and has yet to suffer from MAS after getting it.

    I know some folks don't like them, but the couple of Northfield Big Mon models I've played and heard have been incredible. But I like the sound they are going for. Same with a Collings F model. But I'm biased and have a Collings.

    But again, think about what type of sound and handling you are looking for. And don't necessarily think you will adapt. Have owned a couple of nice instruments that I figured eventually will get used to the neck. Nope. Ended up trading them off because of hand problems that cropped up. Whether they were directly caused by the neck or not is probably up for debate, but I felt it was enough of a factor to move on them.

    Enjoy the search. It might take some time. But you will end up with something special.
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  3. #28
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Yes, whatever you do, make sure that the neck is comfortable to you!! Another reason to only do business with sellers who offer a 48 hour return policy. Most of the long established vintage dealers offer such a policy.

    Beware: some of the more recently established stores and many of the small-time operations do not accept returns, or charge a restocking fee. Make sure you know all of the seller's policies before you send the money.

  4. #29
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Thanks for the advice and warnings!

  5. #30
    not a donut Kevin Winn's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Definitely agree with getting the best instrument you can afford, not one you think you are "good enough" to merit buying. Playing a bunch in all price ranges will go a long way in determining that, and your own hands and ears will guide you. Keep an open mind when you are doing that, though. I spent an afternoon at Fiddlers in Austin playing everything from an Ellis on down the price scale to the Eastman I was upgrading from, and kept coming back to the F5S. Then I went and had some killer BBQ...

    Listening to lots of clips on YouTube was helpful for me, especially the ones that are recorded well by some of the high-end shops. It's certainly not a replacement for having one in your hands, but if you listen to enough clips of a Kimble or Collings or whatever, you'll start to get a sense of how each maker's sound profile is composed. That can help narrow down where you start, but be open to something else you pick up in a shop overriding that.

    Near your location, you've got Gryphon, which has lots of Collings, Northfields and even a Pava to try, and if you take the day and drive down to Sylvan in Santa Cruz, you can try a few Webers out. Enjoy the journey!
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  6. #31
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    I’ve owned a Weber Yellowstone mandocello and presently own a Weber bitterroot OM. Both are spectacularly made instruments with outstanding tone and impeccable fit and finish, and both were built after the TOH acquisition. I haven’t played any of their recent mandolins, but can’t see a reason to exclude them from the list given my experience with their larger mandolin family offerings...

  7. #32
    Registered User Charles E.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    This Gary Vessel F-5 just showed up in the classifieds again and is in your area....

    https://www.mandolincafe.com/ads/161087#161087

    NFI
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    A bunch of stuff with four strings

  8. #33
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    I was fortunate to have an understanding wife so I went to a Randy Wood F 5. Completely cured my MAS.

  9. #34
    Registered User lowtone2's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    I compared my new Mike Black A5 to a friend's 25 year old Gilchrist F5. This has to sound like hyperbole, I know, but we both preferred the Black.

  10. #35
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    I’m super tempted by that Vessel, but I’m going to wait. I’ve told myself I need to wait a year. Try out a ton. Get a few lessons from some pros to ensure my right hand technique is on path. But now I at least know what I’m generally looking for.

    I’m also salivating over the Pava Pro F5 website. Lol.

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  12. #36
    Registered User Nick Gellie's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    I am going to be a bit cheeky and say nothing comes after a KM-1050. I believe David Grisman recorded some of his early albums on Kentucky F-5 mandolins. Please correct me if I am wrong. So I believe technique comes before mandolin once you get into the Kentucky 1050 price range. Just a thought.
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  14. #37
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Gellie View Post
    I am going to be a bit cheeky and say nothing comes after a KM-1050. I believe David Grisman recorded some of his early albums on Kentucky F-5 mandolins. Please correct me if I am wrong. So I believe technique comes before mandolin once you get into the Kentucky 1050 price range. Just a thought.
    I agree. The KM-1050 is a pro-level mandolin.
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  16. #38
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    How is the sound of the Kentucky holding back your musical development? But sometimes change just for change can be good.
    Play it like you mean it

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  17. #39
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill McCall View Post
    How is the sound of the Kentucky holding back your musical development? But sometimes change just for change can be good.
    It's not, I've just been curious if there's another level of acoustic depth in higher level models. I absolutely know that I have much practice and playing to go (and technique to improve upon), so I'm not saying it's bad. Just curious if there's more to be had later.

  18. #40
    Registered User Eric F.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    I owned a 1984 KM-1000 that was a beast. I never played it after I got my Arches. There are lots of mandolins likely to make you happy. A KM-1050 is probably one of them. But you will almost certainly notice a great deal of difference as you play more expensive instruments. It's hard to pin down in words, but you'll know it when you hear it. Depth, responsiveness, complexity, a feeling of "Holy smokes I love this thing!" when you pick a few notes or strum a chord. Yes, there is "another level." Probably several. If you play a bunch of high-end instruments and don't get that feeling, count yourself lucky because you're going to save yourself some money.

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  20. #41
    Registered User withfoam's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s after a Kentucky KM-1050?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric F. View Post
    I owned a 1984 KM-1000 that was a beast. I never played it after I got my Arches. There are lots of mandolins likely to make you happy. A KM-1050 is probably one of them. But you will almost certainly notice a great deal of difference as you play more expensive instruments. It's hard to pin down in words, but you'll know it when you hear it. Depth, responsiveness, complexity, a feeling of "Holy smokes I love this thing!" when you pick a few notes or strum a chord. Yes, there is "another level." Probably several. If you play a bunch of high-end instruments and don't get that feeling, count yourself lucky because you're going to save yourself some money.
    Just what I needed to hear. Thanks!

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