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Thread: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

  1. #1

    Default key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Hi

    Hope you are keeping safe in these covid-19 times

    I have just started to learn and also joined this forum. I found a long 2006 post (see extract below) with these 4 digit number codes for 1-4-5, and need help to decipher them. I bought the Gunod chord encyclopedia but i cant see these codes in it.

    TIA/gary

    key of G: #G (0023), C (0230) and D (2002)
    key of D: #D (2002), G (0023), and A (6200 or 2200)

  2. #2
    Be Wild Zach Wilson's Avatar
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Its tab for chord playing. The number indicates what fret is played. An 0 means open.

    So if we break down the first set of numbers in your post it would be:

    G-string: 0 (open) (your root note-G)
    D-string: 0 (open) (the 5th note-D)
    A-string: 2nd fret (a B note, the 3rd)
    E-string: 3rd fret (a G note)

    Strum them all together and this makes an open G chord.

    I hope this helps!

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    Be Wild Zach Wilson's Avatar
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    I forgot to mention that the tab doesn't tell you what finger to use. For this chord it's most common to use your first finger on the 2nd fret, A-string and your middle finger on the 3rd fret, E-string.

    Some chords will have an "x" meaning that the string is muted.

  5. #4

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zach Wilson View Post
    I forgot to mention that the tab doesn't tell you what finger to use. For this chord it's most common to use your first finger on the 2nd fret, A-string and your middle finger on the 3rd fret, E-string.

    Some chords will have an "x" meaning that the string is muted.
    Thanks Zach

    Masterfully clear explanation of a code I have never seen before despite reading tons of tablature!

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    Be Wild Zach Wilson's Avatar
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Seeing that your handle name is electric bassist I imagine you play bass???

    I do too. Bass was my second instrument after learning guitar but has became my primary in band settings. Learning the mandolin opened up a whole new way to approach the bass fretboard and my chords on the bass became a lot more interesting.

    Good luck on your mando-journey.

  7. #6

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Why is there a number/sharp sign in front of the G and D? It isn't being used as a sharp sign, because it is a g natural. Besides, if it was a sharp sign, it would be AFTER the G.

  8. #7

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L View Post
    Why is there a number/sharp sign in front of the G and D? It isn't being used as a sharp sign, because it is a g natural. Besides, if it was a sharp sign, it would be AFTER the G.
    I was wondering the same thing. A sharp sign makes no sense in this context. A pound sign makes no sense either.
    Maybe it's what the young'ns are calling a 'hash-tag', which as far as I can tell only has significance to other young'ns.
    "I play BG so that's what I can talk intelligently about." A line I loved and pirated from Mandoplumb

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    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Well, the key of G is "one sharp" in the key signature, so that might be related.

    Key of D is "two sharps," so there should be a second #.

    Otherwise -- well, give us a link to the thread you're citing, and we could try to get the context.
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    I was assuming that it was being used to mean number??? Since tab is a fret-numbering system.

  11. #10

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Hi Zach

    Good deduction!

    I have stopped owing to surgery on my hand and thought the mandolin would be initially more manageable. And yes I am hoping the mandolin will enrich my bass playing and gie me some direction

    Hope you (and the other Madolin Cafe contributors) are staying safe and mentally well during these COVID-19 times

    Warm regards/gary

  12. #11

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Sorry all,

    Here is where I found it when I was searching for chords:
    Mandolin Cafe Forum > Music by Genre > Celtic, U.K., Nordic, Quebecois, European Folk > Chords
    or
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/a...p/t-26278.html

    So I'll also be happy to get advice on the # because I became fixated on the four digit codes

    Here is the relevant extract from a 2006 post by Ed Sherry:
    "
    At sessions, I generally play the melody, not chords, if I know the tune. #But if I don't know the tune, I'll often chord along. #(I can pick up chord changes to new tunes quicker than I can pick up melodies "on the fly.") #

    I'd recommend learning some basic 1-4-5 chords for such situations.

    In the key of D: #D (2002), G (0023), and A (6200 or 2200).

    In the key of G: #G (0023), C (0230) and D (2002).

    In the key of A: #A (2200 or 6200), D (2002) and E (1220 or 1020).

    In the key of Em: #Em (0220), Am (2230 or 2235) and B7 (4022).

    In the key of Am: #Am (2230), Dm (2001) and E7 (1020).

    In E dorian: #Em (0220) and D (2002).

    In A dorian: #Am (2200 or 2230) and G (0023).

    In B dorian: #Bm (4022) and A (2200 or 6200).

    That covers about 90-95% of the tunes I run across in sessions. There are obviously lots of other chords available.
    "

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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by electric bassist View Post
    Sorry all,

    Here is where I found it when I was searching for chords:
    Mandolin Cafe Forum > Music by Genre > Celtic, U.K., Nordic, Quebecois, European Folk > Chords
    or
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/a...p/t-26278.html

    So I'll also be happy to get advice on the # because I became fixated on the four digit codes

    Here is the relevant extract from a 2006 post by Ed Sherry:
    "
    At sessions, I generally play the melody, not chords, if I know the tune. #But if I don't know the tune, I'll often chord along. #(I can pick up chord changes to new tunes quicker than I can pick up melodies "on the fly.") #

    I'd recommend learning some basic 1-4-5 chords for such situations.

    In the key of D: #D (2002), G (0023), and A (6200 or 2200).

    In the key of G: #G (0023), C (0230) and D (2002).

    In the key of A: #A (2200 or 6200), D (2002) and E (1220 or 1020).

    In the key of Em: #Em (0220), Am (2230 or 2235) and B7 (4022).

    In the key of Am: #Am (2230), Dm (2001) and E7 (1020).

    In E dorian: #Em (0220) and D (2002).

    In A dorian: #Am (2200 or 2230) and G (0023).

    In B dorian: #Bm (4022) and A (2200 or 6200).

    That covers about 90-95% of the tunes I run across in sessions. There are obviously lots of other chords available.
    "

    Looks to me like the three chord trick...........

  14. #13
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by electric bassist View Post
    Hope you (and the other Madolin Cafe contributors) are staying safe and mentally well during these COVID-19 times

    Warm regards/gary
    Thank you for your thoughts!

    I live in a more... shall we say, "progress" state were State shut downs and mask regulations came very early.

    I have been deemed "essential" as my vocation is in Food Manufacturing and have been really only at work (lots of hours to keep up with demand) or home (and a couple Church music things). I dont mind due to the fact that I am fairly reclusive anyway (I'm a homebody). I do however miss playing music with others in jam settings.

    I wish you the best. Stay safe as well!

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  16. #14

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    I think that the "#" signs are a formatting problem. They are from a 14-year-old post from EdSherry, and are used randomly throughout the post.

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  18. #15

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    These are useful simplified chords to start out. The sooner you can transition to full four finger or three finger forms the better off you will be. None of these forms are really movable so they will not serve you when a vocalist wants to do a song in Bb or C#. The 2200 A is actually a power chord with just A and E notes and is missing the C#. And he has not given you an F chord form which is important in the keys of C and F or Bb for the key of F. I would definitely add those two chords to the list.

    I recommend to people starting to learn accompaniment that they learn the 1,4 and 5 chords for the sharp keys C, G, D, A and E along with the flat key F if they are going to play string band music. In minor keys you need the 1, 4 and 5 in Am, Em, Dm and Bm keys. The 5 in the minor key will be a dominant 7(major chord) If you are going to play with bluegrass vocalists you need to learn the chords for keys of B and Bb as well. If you play with horns then you need to learn the flatted keys C, F, Bb, Eb and Ab as well as 3-6-2-5-1 progressions in those keys. Commercial pop and country can go either way depending on how it is produced.

    The chords in the posting are good within their limitations but they certainly would not cover 90 or 95 percent of the sessions or gigs I play.

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  20. #16
    Registered User jefflester's Avatar
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    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L View Post
    I think that the "#" signs are a formatting problem. They are from a 14-year-old post from EdSherry, and are used randomly throughout the post.
    Yes, exactly. If you go through old posts you'll find that sometimes. Not quite sure what it is, a tab or extra space that has been converted to #?
    Here's a good example:
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/t...l=1#post533457

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  22. #17

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Iím another beginner racing to catch up. Your advice about moveable chords is so valuable to me. Many, many thanks!

  23. #18

    Default Re: key of G: #G (0023) etc what does it mean?

    Thanks for that CarlM

    I have added your suggestions to the Ed Sherry list and seen how the Gunod encyclopedia represents them

    Warm regards/gary

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