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Thread: Your first great mandolin

  1. #1
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    Default Your first great mandolin

    Last Saturday was NMD for me as my "new to me" Northfield F5S arrived at my door. After letting it warm up from the cold trip across the country, I finally unboxed, basked in its beauty, and started to pick.

    Not only is it my first F5, but it's also my first "pro-level" mandolin after starting out on an Eastman 305 (not to say that the right hands can't play any mandolin professionally).

    To my ears, the tone coming out of this mandolin is both sweet and bright, punchy and delicate. The neck and setup are perfect in my hands. It is truly a joy to play, and I find myself already elevating my playing. Likely a byproduct of the sheer amount of playing I'm putting in, but also the ability to draw out the sound I'm looking for from the mandolin. I can hardly put it down, and with working from home during the pandemic, I have the supreme luxury of picking a tune whenever I have a few minutes between meetings.

    This experience got me thinking, I wonder what other folks first "great" mandolin experience was like? Would love to hear your stories.
    Northfield F5S
    Northfield Calhoun
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    Registered User Jill McAuley's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    I spent the first year or so of serious mandolin playing doing a lot of catch and release as I moved my way up the mandolin food chain. I'd have to say the first mandolin that showed me the difference between spending a little more money on something was a Weber Aspen II that I bought, after selling a Flatiron 2M pancake - the neck on the Weber was so easy playing it really lit the spark for me as I just found myself logging more and more time on the mandolin and less on other instruments, but as for my first GREAT mandolin I've had a lot of nice ones over the years but can definitely say that my Girouard Concert A is head and shoulders above them all as far as sound and comfort playing. I had a nice Collings MT-O before it that I was very happy with and it seemed like it would be a keeper, as it met all my needs quite well, but after getting a chance to play a Girouard oval A that another student had at one of Marla Fibish's Winter mandolin intensives back in Feb 2018 it was just completely on another level and I immediately contacted Max to put an order in.
    2018 Girouard Concert oval A
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  5. #3

    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by Jcdraayer View Post
    I find myself already elevating my playing. Likely a byproduct of the sheer amount of playing I'm putting in, but also the ability to draw out the sound I'm looking for from the mandolin. I can hardly put it down, and with working from home during the pandemic, I have the supreme luxury of picking a tune whenever I have a few minutes between meetings.
    This really sums up my experience with the Wide Nut Northfield F5S I got on Black Friday.

    I’ve made more progress in the last 2 months than the 6 prior (and I thought I made great progress then!). I haven’t had to work nearly as hard for the progress. Everything just continues to come together and get better and better.

    The hours of dedicated, focused practice are obviously a big factor, but the instrument itself makes those hours of “practice” feel like hours of “playing”.

    It’s the practice that is elevating me, but the instrument is elevating my practice.

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Starting I played some unknown brand A that had a crack in the middle of the back, upgraded that to a used Pacrim Kentucky ( which I still have on loan to a friend) and a Pacrim F style Washburn ( which I let go of not too long ago). They were great but playing next to a Gibson or a Monteleone or a Weber, they paled in comparison.

    My first "great" mandolin was my Rigel G110, I was living in Connecticut and went up to Maple Leaf Music in Vermont to look at some New Rigels they had, and knew this was a good one.
    This was the mandolin that got me up on the stage and playing with various bands and perhaps more adventurous musicians.
    I still have it and while I went to a Macica ( local luthier) F5 for a stage mandolin, I still have the Rigel and I still play it regularly and still am not ready to part with it.
    sentimental old fool that I am.
    "Mean Old Timer, He's got grey hair, Mean Old Timer he just don't care
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    All he does is sit around an play the Mandolin"

  8. #5

    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    In the Uk in 1973 there were not many Gibson mandolins for sale. I had seen the F4 by Jimmy Gregor and although I loved the scroll shape knew it would be very unlikely to find one like that or even afford it. I was just after any Gibson mandolin. No internet, no mobile phones, just the Melody Maker Magazine and I saw an A40 in London somewhere. Seemed a but risky but mentioned my interest to a few music friends. One said his grandad, who was in a retirement home, had an Gibson A style but not for sale. I just wanted to see it so we arranged that.

    When he opened the original case, it was just the most fantastic feeling. It was a black 1932 A-0 from memory with. The original case and mandolin were both in great condition. The Gibson in silver script acroos the headstock. He told me that he had been in India in 1930 when he ordered it, waited a year and when it arrived, the neck was broken. He contacted Gibson. It was sent back and they sent him a replacement. I desperately wanted it but thanked him for letting me see it. Two weeks later he phoned me at work saying he could do with a new settee so I could have it for £150. I bought it and not long after played it live on televsion with Edinburgh folk roup Carterbar. That was a thrill. I kept if for about 10 tears and then lost interest and swapped it for a guitar.

    I'll never forget just holding that Gibson with the really thick top, compared to the lightweight Levin I had been playing. My first thoughts were that I coudn't hear the Gibson as the Levin had been much brighter. It took me about three gigs before I realised that it was a great mandolin and made to last. Needless to say I wish I'd kept it. I've had over 20 Gibson mandolins since then plus countless others.

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    Registered User Tom Sanderson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Mine was a Nugget 2 point (#147). I got it in 1991. It totally changed my playing for the better. It was so awesome that I had a hard time putting it down.

  10. #7
    two t's and one hyphen fatt-dad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    after cycling through a flip-it phase, I'd seen, heard, and owned a lot of the MIJ mid-tier instruments. These were all against my Kay - the Kay from my high school days. Then I bought my Carlson Flatiron A5-1. (And another journey began!)

    SOLD!

    f-d
    ¡papá gordo ain’t no madre flaca!

    '20 A3, '30 L-1, '97 914, 2012 Cohen A5, 2012 Muth A5, '14 OM28A

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Silverangel Econo for me, stepping up from a Kentucky 675-S that was an EBay purchase with some issues. Man, what a world of difference totally and with playability! Congrats on your Northfield!
    Chuck

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by Jill McAuley View Post
    I spent the first year or so of serious mandolin playing doing a lot of catch and release as I moved my way up the mandolin food chain. I'd have to say the first mandolin that showed me the difference between spending a little more money on something was a Weber Aspen II that I bought, after selling a Flatiron 2M pancake - the neck on the Weber was so easy playing it really lit the spark for me as I just found myself logging more and more time on the mandolin and less on other instruments, but as for my first GREAT mandolin I've had a lot of nice ones over the years but can definitely say that my Girouard Concert A is head and shoulders above them all as far as sound and comfort playing. I had a nice Collings MT-O before it that I was very happy with and it seemed like it would be a keeper, as it met all my needs quite well, but after getting a chance to play a Girouard oval A that another student had at one of Marla Fibish's Winter mandolin intensives back in Feb 2018 it was just completely on another level and I immediately contacted Max to put an order in.
    I agree with Jill as a Girouard oval is at the top of the food chain !! Fantastic sound and workmanship !

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    I have a Gibson and a custom Hicks, and yet to this day my favorite mandolin was a Breedlove cascade that I never should have sold...

  16. #11

    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    My first mandolin was a ... not a Gretch but some other Chinese-made American-branded plywood contraption I bought for $200 after drinking two martinis with my friend Tom. I have to say I thought it was pretty good sounding!

    But then, a year or two later, I traded a National guitar for a 1950 Gibson F12 and I was in pig heaven for a long time. I nicknamed the F12 The General. I played the dickens out of it and gave it to my son when he went away to college. The F12 has a sweet sweet tone but zero volume. I then bought a series of instruments, and I thought each was the most amazing sounding mandolin ever: a Collings MT, a Gibson F5 Adam Steffey ...

    Somewhere about then, I realized I was only beginning to know what a good-sounding mandolin ***actually*** sounds like.

    A Duff F5 was probably the first objectively really superior-sounding mandolin I've owned. Had it made 10 years ago and still have it. I've tried a lot of As and am quite happy with the Ellis A5 Tradition, made with hide glue and shellac. But the best-sounding mandolin I've every heard or played is my Red Diamond July 9. It is truly something special.
    Ellis A5 Tradition, Red Diamond F5, Duff F5, D35, Gliga violin.
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    My first “good” one was a Collings MT... nuff said

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    MN Mandolin Orchestra Benjamin Gieseke's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    The first mandolin I ever played was my grandparents 1919 Gibson A-2, complete with 30 year old strings and original frets that were so flat it was almost unplayable. Without a frame of reference I thought mandolin was just *that* hard to play and gave it back. A few years later I picked up a Fender Fm-52 (I think? The one with the pickup) that had frets so worn as to be almost unplayable, but again, I thought that was just how mandolin played so I quite literally knuckled down and played the thing for several years.

    Fast forward a few years again, I played a "The Loar" LM-400 at a music store and was just *shocked* at how easy it was to play and how nice it sounded. My lovely then fiancee tracked it down as a surprise for me. Unfortunately its carved, non-braced top was no match for a couple rounds of Minnesota winter and it bit the dust a couple years later. I was pretty dejected, it was very important to me both sentimentally and musically.

    We started to look around for a replacement that we felt would be more solidly constructed, be more of a "lifetime" instrument, at least in theory. I played just about every mandolin with a hundred miles of the Twin Cities before I found my Summit F-200x at Dave's Guitars in LaCrosse, WI. I played every instrument in the store (including a Loar!) but wound up circling back around to this instrument and playing it for a couple of hours. I showed my wife how to play a G chord so I could hear it from another perspective and confirm that it did sound that much richer than my past instruments. We weren't well off financially at that time and it was about 2.5x what I had figured for a budget so I went to put it back on the rack and told my wife "maybe someday...". She looked at me and just said "What are you doing? We're not leaving here without it!" It took a long time to pay off, BUT, it has been absolutely worth it to play an instrument of this quality, and I am so grateful to my wife for making it happen. It plays beautifully, has a LOT of volume on tap, and has a very present midrange that helps it stand out in a mix/orchestra/band without sounding thin. I imagine at this point I will hang on to it forever, for the beauty of the gift as much as the quality of the instrument.
    Summit F-200X (#133)
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  22. #14
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy powells View Post
    ... It was a black 1932 A-0 from memory ... I'll never forget just holding that Gibson with the really thick top ... It took me about three gigs before I realised that it was a great mandolin and made to last.
    So, here I was, thinking of whipping up a semi-snarky post regarding my teens Gibson A, extolling her virtues versus fancier Gibsons and newer ones from modern makers ... only to find there are those who consider such relics "great." I must say, I'm a bit perplexed, but also pleased. Perhaps all these years, I didn't understand how good I've got it. That was my introduction to the mandolin some seventy-leven years ago, and apart from those thirty years when I dallied with a 1970s F-12 that never did get to sound as good, that's been my only experience with mandolins. Well, except for the older one with the pineapple tailpiece cover that's with the luthier for awhile, getting brought up to speed, and whatever snazzy F-style Dave Reiner brings with him on his annual Key West vacation. So maybe I'm spoiled, or just a wee tad ignorant or underdeveloped, but since I've never had a chance to check out any of the newer ones people rave about, and love the way old Molly sounds just fine, what I've got is A-OK with me. She always sounds just like I want her to, even when the strings are a good bit past old. My tastes could have been formed the way they have, and nothing else sounds right due to that, but there's much to be said for starting off at a good level from Day One.
    But that's just my opinion. I could be wrong. - Dennis Miller

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by journeybear View Post
    So, here I was, thinking of whipping up a semi-snarky post regarding my teens Gibson A, extolling her virtues versus fancier Gibsons and newer ones from modern makers ... only to find there are those who consider such relics "great." I must say, I'm a bit perplexed, but also pleased. Perhaps all these years, I didn't understand how good I've got it. That was my introduction to the mandolin some seventy-leven years ago, and apart from those thirty years when I dallied with a 1970s F-12 that never did get to sound as good, that's been my only experience with mandolins. Well, except for the older one with the pineapple tailpiece cover that's with the luthier for awhile, getting brought up to speed, and whatever snazzy F-style Dave Reiner brings with him on his annual Key West vacation. So maybe I'm spoiled, or just a wee tad ignorant or underdeveloped, but since I've never had a chance to check out any of the newer ones people rave about, and love the way old Molly sounds just fine, what I've got is A-OK with me. She always sounds just like I want her to, even when the strings are a good bit past old. My tastes could have been formed the way they have, and nothing else sounds right due to that, but there's much to be said for starting off at a good level from Day One.
    Love the one your with!

    I get that!

    f-d
    ¡papá gordo ain’t no madre flaca!

    '20 A3, '30 L-1, '97 914, 2012 Cohen A5, 2012 Muth A5, '14 OM28A

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    Registered User John Soper's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    My first great mandolin was a 1920 refrigerator white A3, but had to sell that to finance a move - always regretted that sale 40+ years ago. Since I re-upped with mandolin in the past 30 years or so, I've cycled through several mandolins - my next great one was a Duff F-5 X-braced that is currently being loved by a friend, but I'm pretty satisfied with a Nugget A-5, an Ellis twin point, and a Sorensen twin point. I have yet to decide which of those I'll end up keeping when I downsize because they are all great in their own way - the electric guitars & amps are gonna go first!

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    Registered User Eric F.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by John Soper View Post
    I'm pretty satisfied with a Nugget A-5, an Ellis twin point, and a Sorensen twin point.
    If you said you weren't, I'd be worried.

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  29. #18
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    I have never turned over a mandolin. I have only ever bought two mandolins. My first was a Vega bowl back from Jim Garber. I still have it, it is a beautiful sounding bowl back and I have no desire to part with it. The next and last was an Oldwave Oval A, also an exceptional sounding instrument. I have messed around with building mostly just experimenting till destruction. Maybe someday I'll have a third when I build something I can stop messing with until it's destroyed, but hey that's how we learn.

    Hey, congratulations on the new mandolin. I bet you just love it!
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

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    Registered User Charles E.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    My first great mandolin was a 1917 black faced Gibson F-2. It was beautiful in looks and sound. Unfortunately I had to sell it to make a tuition payment while in school.

    I still wonder what happened to it.
    Charley

    A bunch of stuff with four strings

  32. #20

    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by kefaragon View Post
    I have a Gibson and a custom Hicks, and yet to this day my favorite mandolin was a Breedlove cascade that I never should have sold...
    (Hey, just FYI, Elderly Instruments has a used (2009) Breedlove Cascade for sale.)

    My recently acquired Collings MT-O is as "great" as my mandolin possession will ever be, but I think I can live with that.

  33. #21
    Be Wild Zach Wilson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    My Parents gave me my first mandolin, a ply wood Fender FM100 or something when I was 16. I had a few others that I traded or sold, nothing "real nice" though...

    Then I simply signed up for The Mandolin Stores Black Friday contest a few years back, like I always do. When Dennis called me I fell to the floor! My wife looked shocked! The room spun around, etc. I really couldn't believe it!!!

    My Yellowstone has become my forever instrument- it really does keep MAS at bay for me.

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  35. #22
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    I had inherited an old Rex bowlback from my great uncle, and became infatuated with the sound of the mandolin. Very quickly, I realized I needed something better, but I was broke. What to do? However, that tiny little neck sure made me learn precise fingering.

    There was a music store in Morganton, NC, we discovered, called "Blue Ridge Music." Wow, there were REAL instruments there -- Older Martins, Gibsons -- and an odd mix of mandolins, banjos, and fiddles. The local musical hangout.

    My wife and I spent Sat. morning hanging out in the repair shop, talking to Marvin Willis, who was an encyclopedia of musical lore, especially fiddle, which my wife had taken up. His real love was fiddles.

    One Saturday I noticed old Gibson A under his work bench, covered with dust. "What's that?" I asked him.

    "OH, that came in on a trade for an electric guitar. It's hot, we are waiting for the police to let us know what to do with it." He paused. "You might be interested?"

    "Yeah, "I told him, " just let me know if you hear anything."

    About a month later he gave me a call. "We can go ahead and sell this mandolin, if you want to look at it, " he told me, " we put a set of strings on it and it's got the sound."
    "What's the price?" I asked.
    "150 bucks., " he said. "No case. Sorry." I was determined to check it out. Even though I hadn't even seen it, much less heard it.

    The following Sat. I went to Morganton with a Japanese banjo I had bought and couldn't figure out how to play, and a hundred dollars, all the free money I had.

    The mandolin was a 1919 A-O, Sheraton top with a repaired back crack. But, it did play really well, and had a very crisp tone.

    "It's got the sound," Marvin reiterated. He was right.

    So after negotiating with the store owner, Bev Hairfield, who realized my plight, we did the deal, and I loaded the mandolin into the back seat of my car. On the way home, I kept opening up the box, and looking at it, not believing my luck. I had a REAL mandolin. There was no stopping me now.

    I've still got it, and even though I have other Gibsons that can out perform it, I can't bear to part with it, since it paved the way for my whole decades long mandolin experience.

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    That's a great story Zookster. I also got my first good mandolin from Marvin Willis. He was a character for sure. I had a Kentucky KM1500 that I had purchased new. I never thought it was a very good mandolin. One night at a jam in Old Fort I was talking with Danny Bishop and he told that Marvin Willis had to nice mandolins for sale. One was a Kettler the other was a Hutto. I contacted Marvin and made arrangements to check them out. They were both far better sounding than what I was playing. I would go by and play them every couple of weeks. One trip i would favor theKettler, next trip the Hutto. I would go back and forth like this for several weeks. I just couldn't decide between the two. I finally told my wife one day, I'm going to look at those mandolins today and which ever one I like today I'm bringing home. I Wound up trading the Kentucky and some cash for the Kettler. It was a super mandolin.

    Adam

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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    1975 Ome A style. What made it great was that Nugget made it.

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  40. #25
    Professional Dreamer journeybear's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your first great mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by zookster View Post
    I've still got it, and even though I have other Gibsons that can out perform it, I can't bear to part with it, since it paved the way for my whole decades long mandolin experience.
    That's how I feel about my first one. It was a gift from my mom, who'd sensed in me some sort of affinity for music. After my folks' divorce she'd gone back to work, as personnel director for the Goodwill in Bridgeport CT. One day the collections truck came in, and off from it came this teens Gbson A in original case. She struck a deal for half what you were first quoted - this was 1967 - and at an opportune occasion she was presented to me.

    Now, my mom had tried me on a guitar a couple of years earlier, but I couldn't make sense of it. Six strings, four fingers - still doesn't make sense. Plus it was a Sears $20 special, and the neck warped until the strings were more than an inch above the fretboard at the join. One day I tore the strings off, strangled it with them, and tossed it into the attic, never to be seen again. But four sets of double strings made perfect sense, a one-to-one correspondence that worked, mathematically and practically. Plus those regular fifth intervals and ringing tone kept me interested long enough till I sorted it out. To some extent.

    Some ten years or so later, I picked up a snazzy-looking F-12, entranced by the slinky, sexy, sci-fi design. My main means of transportation at the time was hitchhiking, and it was getting to be a bit cumbersome to travel with two instruments. So when I went on an adventure, I left the A behind with my girlfriend (or soon to be ex-girlfriend) for either safekeeping or defrayment of rent (or both), and never did get back. Little did I know at the time that that late-70s F-12 would never become half the instrument the A was, even with its repaired cracked back. It took its theft thirty years later, and subsequent replacement by another Gibson A, for me to learn the error of my ways. Oh, with plenty of insights from the knowledgeable folks around here as well.

    So do I wish I had that first one back? Oh yes, you bet! Doesn't seem about to happen any day soon, though ...

    Quote Originally Posted by fatt-dad View Post
    Love the one your with!

    I get that!
    It's partly that, partly also it's the one from the formative years, that set my mind and ears and tastes on their way. Sort of by default setting. As I said, though, I really haven't shopped around a whole lot, nor even taken spins on other folks' instruments at jams and such. So I tend to defer to others who have when this subject comes up. But, as I also said, I'm heartened to hear from others here that I've done pretty well all the same.
    But that's just my opinion. I could be wrong. - Dennis Miller

    Furthering Mandolin Consciousness

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    North Florida Mandolin Players Social Group

    The big blowhard in his conch shell blowing championship form

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