Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Metronome & flow

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    30

    Default Metronome & flow

    Lately Iíve been incorporating using a metronome more and more often during my playing sessions. While at first it get quite tedious and ďlike practiceĒ (likely a flashback to childhood forced piano lessons), now I find myself hardly wanting to play without it.

    I find that itís easier for me to get into a flow state while playing and really connecting with the tune Iím working on if Iím incorporating the metronome. Anyone else find that to be the case?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    1,098

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    Metronome is good, and if you are practicing regularly with a metronome that will make a noticeable difference in your playing, so keep that up!

    I don't practice enough with it, but I do use it when learning a tune.

    I often use a click track when recording solo, I remember we tried the click track when recording as a band and it didn't really work, was hard to hear when all 4 members were playing and we quickly got out of step with it, our own organic interplay timing took over.

    The important thing is to lose the metronome at some point ( not for practice but for performing) , training wheels is perhaps not the correct analogy, but the metronome is for guidance during learning and practice, so if you can find another musician who has decent timing and rhythm, that will help with flow a lot too.

    often rhythm becomes more important than melody, and if the players get too far out of sync - its a train wreck ( been there done that).

    But practicing regularly with a metronome is absolutely the right thing to do, so stay on that course!
    "Mean Old Timer, He's got grey hair, Mean Old Timer he just don't care
    Got no compassion, thinks its a sin
    All he does is sit around an play the Mandolin"

  3. The following members say thank you to tmsweeney for this post:

    Bren 

  4. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    St. Louis, MO area
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    I also prefer playing/practicing with a metronome. Has helped me to play cleaner for sure

  5. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Guildford + Falmouth England
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    I'm in two minds about metronome use. I think it's great for working up technique etc, but possibly not so good for working at finished songs and tunes. The reason is, that I suspect a lot of good musical flow feel doesn't fit rigidly within the metronome beat other than at the beginning and end of a verse. I've several times been in recordings where songs with a good feel turned out to begin and finish verses etc on time, but varied in between. We found out after we tried to fit sequenced samples onto acoustic recordings, and discovered that the acoustic track ran ahead predictably in the middle of each verse (it could equally have slowed down). We had someone who knew how to vary the speed of the samples, and they worked it out so the samples followed the speed of the acoustic tracks. The songwriter tried to do it with a metronome, and it just didn't feel right. This wasn't bluegrass, mind you...

  6. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Kernersville, NC
    Posts
    2,591
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    Speeding up while playing solo is an issue for me and a metronome is an easy cure. It can take some discipline to stay synced, but finding a groove is easy enough. Like having a perfect drummer. I sometimes set metronome to twice the target speed (or half). Having an off count helps me with feel. ymmv

  7. #6
    Registered User Scotter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    This thread reminds me that I don't use a metronome as much as I should. But I have been using iReal Pro a lot for practice lately and especially if I'm working up a solo derangement of a tune that I really want to work in a solo or two.
    Play that which you feel is groovy, get down with your bad self, and shake your money maker if it makes sense for you to do so.

  8. #7

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    I have been in bands where everyone doing their metronome woodshedding paid off.

    I have *never* witnessed a situation wherein someone suddenly had great timing emerge out of nowhere.

    Interestingly, those who learned to really work with their metronome had no problem later following tempo-mapped sequences, where a MIDI tempo varies, or even a variable click track with prerecorded sections inserted into live work.

    Even working to visual cues (full band stops and starts on a dime) were helped by timing/metronome work.

    The most interesting thing I've discovered is an ironclad inverse relationship between someone's claims of impeccable timing... and their actual timing. When someone absolutely puts limits on what one will do to develop musicianship, it shows.

    ----

    Incidentally, my favorite use of a metronome is to count the clicks as a backbeat on counts 2 and 4, or on 2 and 5 on a 6-beat jazz waltz rhythm. That offset click makes the swing pop.

  9. #8
    Gummy Bears and Scotch BrianWilliam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Summit County Colorado
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    Quote Originally Posted by Scotter View Post
    ...especially if I'm working up a solo derangement...

  10. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Guildford + Falmouth England
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    Quote Originally Posted by Explorer View Post
    The most interesting thing I've discovered is an ironclad inverse relationship between someone's claims of impeccable timing... and their actual timing. When someone absolutely puts limits on what one will do to develop musicianship, it shows.
    That's cos metronomes are never in time

  11. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    1,113

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    I really dig metronome work. One of my projects these days is applying it to very syncopated melodies (latin, jazz, funky fiddle tunes), stuff where I find I can easily push a little too far ahead or lag a little too much when playing solo. This doesn't tend to be a problem when I play with my regular crowd, as we're pretty simpatico rhythm-wise, but it does highlight the parts where I'm not as smooth as I'd like to be. Recently heard an interesting variant, which is to record oneself and then check it against the metronome. The idea intrigues me, but also freaks me out a bit, since I really dislike the whole recording process.
    Mitch Russell

  12. #11

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    I use a phone app metronome called Time Guru. It has a feature that you can turn on to make it randomly drop clicks on beats and it's up to you to keep the time yourself till the click comes back in. It starts with all the clicks for several measures and then starts dropping clicks. You can also set the percentage of clicks it eventually drops. I think that helps you internalize the time rather than depending on the external click. It kind of takes you by surprise and throws you off until you get used to the click dropping out.

    onassis: There's also an app called LiveBPM that can listen to your recorded playback and tell you what the bmp is as the music goes by. Will show you where you are slowing down and speeding up.
    Palatable to a Goat: Music from Gregg Daigle and Don Grieser
    http://HillbillyChamberMusic.bandcamp.com

  13. The following members say thank you to Don Grieser for this post:


  14. #12
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    28,349

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    After years I finally found a metronome I can stand (the Seiko one) and it fits in my case. I usually start on a new tune or meter with a quarter note (4 beats per measure in 4/4) as the beat and then switch later to half note (2 beats per measure) and possibly whole note (1 beat per measure). I also use it to increase the speed of my playing comfortably, hitting all the notes clearly and working on phrasing. I switch back and forth between playing with and without it.
    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
    Facebook
    19th Century Tunes
    Playing lately:
    2018 Campanella A-5 -- 2007 Brentrup A4C -- 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin -- Huss & Dalton DS -- 1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead -- '83 Flatiron A5-2 -- 1939 Gibson L-00 -- 1936 Epiphone Deluxe -- 1928 Gibson L-5 -- ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo -- ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo -- ca. 1920 Weymann Style 25 Mandolin-Banjo -- National RM-1

  15. #13
    Timothy Tim Logan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Shutesbury, MA
    Posts
    562

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    My metronome is adroit at pointing out some of my really stupid misreadings of sheet music!

    ďThere are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.Ē ― Albert Schweitzer

    1925 Lyon & Healy Model A, #1674
    2015 Collings A (MT2-V)
    2020 Burgin Shanghai Octave Mandolin

  16. #14

    Default Re: Metronome & flow

    Rather than a click track I use a sacrificial beat track. The click bleeds through. Or maybe I just think it bleeds though.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •