Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Mandolino toscano

  1. #1

    Default Mandolino toscano

    While searching for simple jps images of common partial scrolls with square finials for some correspondence in a different forum, I stumbled across this little article: http://lippi.net/mandolino-bresciano...scano/?lang=ko

    For the nerds who might care, enjoy. I've mentioned my preference for this nomenclature in the past, citing the organological appendix from Pisani's (1899) method.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Eugene For This Useful Post:


  3. #2

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    I've shared before, but to contribute to the conversation at hand, here's my own ca.1890s mandolino toscano by Bavassano & Figlio.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	top-03.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	447.8 KB 
ID:	192186

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bowl-03.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	404.8 KB 
ID:	192187

    (By the way, both images are rotated from the orientation in which they appear when viewing the files directly on my own computer. Weird.)

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Eugene For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Joe B mandopops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    West of Chicago
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    Thanx, Eugene, for your usual historic postings. I have a rather surface knowledge of the various early Mandolins designs. I have mused that I’d like to have a Tuscan Mandolin, 4 gut strings, tuned in fifths, played with plectrum. I thought Bach & Vivaldi would sound interesting. Perhaps, I’m historically misguided. I could accept correction. Is the 6 string Baroque Mandolin more appropriate? I don’t know if I’m up to learn a new instrument, especially if it’s just for my own private playing. Any recordings you know of the Tuscan?
    Thanx,
    Joe B
    A Splendid Time is Guaranteed for All

  6. The following members say thank you to mandopops for this post:


  7. #4

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    I might argue in favor of playing any music you'd like on whatever instrument you happen to have on hand. If what you have on hand is different from the instrument for which it was written, simply acknowledge it as so. That said, if you want to play something like Vivaldi's dedicated mandolin music, it was composed specifically for five- or six-course mandolino tuned [g], b, e', a', d", g", and his mandolin fits that tuning really easily. If you want to play arrangements of other works, any instrument qualifies for as much arrangement as any other; have at it and have fun! Going earlier, however, the mandolino cremonese/bresciano was also strung in four single gut strings (g, d', a', e") and, like the Neapolitan type that we all know and love, appears to have its origins in the mid 1700s.

    Unfortunately, I don't know of any recordings on the ca. 1900 Tuscan type. Zigiotti–Merlante used to have a recording of a Paganini piece played on such an instrument posted to their web site, but that was probably 15 years ago. The recording disappeared certainly by the time they'd released a recording of the Paganini mandolin works played on a Genoese mandolin. However, there are a fair number of recordings of the Cremonese/Brescian type that will at least sound similar. I'm being beckoned to supper, but will try to compile a list soon.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Eugene For This Useful Post:


  9. #5

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    Oops. I'm wrong. I'd forgotten that Alon Sariel uses a Tuscan mandolin as a reasonable facsimile of Brescian mandolin and is good enough to even name it correctly! (Although I am skeptical of his approximated vintage for it.) E.g.,




    . . . and:

    Elias, I., A. Sariel, and M. Tsalka. 2015. Paisiello in Vienna. Brilliant Classics, 95301.

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Eugene For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Joe B mandopops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    West of Chicago
    Posts
    544

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    Thanx & thanx, Eugene. I was curious on your historical perspective. Of course, Iím always open to find what works for me & have a go at it. Iíve heard the Baroque Mandolin live & on record & been intrigued by the sound. I think the tuning & fingerboard would be more effort than I want to take on. The Tuscan seems a compromise, getting the single gut string sound without learning a new instrument.
    The video with Alon is perfect. I like hearing the Tuscan with a String Quartet. It really puts in a context. I like the intimate chamber group sound. Iím glad to see Alon. Iím fortunate to have met him several times & attended a couple of his workshops. Heís a warm engaging chap & a superb player. Best wishes to Alon.
    Thanx again, Eugene.
    Joe B
    A Splendid Time is Guaranteed for All

  12. The following members say thank you to mandopops for this post:

    Eugene 

  13. #7
    Registered User Scotter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    Quote Originally Posted by Eugene View Post
    I've shared before, but to contribute to the conversation at hand, here's my own ca.1890s mandolino toscano by Bavassano & Figlio.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	top-03.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	447.8 KB 
ID:	192186

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bowl-03.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	404.8 KB 
ID:	192187

    (By the way, both images are rotated from the orientation in which they appear when viewing the files directly on my own computer. Weird.)
    Eugene,

    I don't remember seeing this one upon my return visit to Planet oHIo in September 2019. It's probably a good thing since I would probably want to finger pick it or strum it like an ukulele. Looking forwards to the next get together for some beer drinkin', pickin' and grinnin' and maybe some Salmon smokin'.
    Play that which you feel is groovy, get down with your bad self, and shake your money maker if it makes sense for you to do so.

  14. #8

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    I'm hip . . . and have a little beer on hand.

    I don't recall: when you last visited, this piece might have still been with the guy who was making its case.

  15. #9
    Registered User Louise NM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    614

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    Eugene, what is the origin of the square finial? To 21st-century eyes, the square of mother-of-pearl looks like some sort of screen or monitor that will light up with information at any moment.

  16. #10

    Default Re: Mandolino toscano

    It's hard to say (or hard for me to say because I don't know). That square finial with the sickle-shaped pegbox was pretty common to a number of necked chordophones spanning the baroque era, including the original fourth-tuned "mandolino" and mandolino cremonese/bresciano. Of course, cremonese/bresciano went kinda extinct, that fourth-tuned baroque-era mandolino eventually evolved into mandolino lombardo which in turn inspired mandolino toscano to place that tone quality into the hands of late-19th-c. fifth-tuned mandolin players—a convergent evolution kinda thing.

  17. The following members say thank you to Eugene for this post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •