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Thread: Headstock drilling jig.

  1. #51
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Threads revolve and change and there are always bits that help in all divergences. Like my ryobi people laugh at it but it cuts and I can tune it up to cut excellently. A bit under powered but workable. I don’t need more but that doesn’t stop me wanting more! Fortunately sometimes my wisdom kicks in, sadly sometimes it doesn’t.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  2. #52

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Yes the headstock drilling. Mike Dulak made himself the cleverest one I have seen for a staright sided peghead. I will try to get a Image or video. Two hinged flaps on each side of a pin index, fastened to a dedacated drillpress. We had a foot pedal on it for a while so you could hold the work with both hands.

  3. #53
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bertotti View Post
    Threads revolve and change and there are always bits that help in all divergences. Like my ryobi people laugh at it but it cuts and I can tune it up to cut excellently. A bit under powered but workable. I don’t need more but that doesn’t stop me wanting more! Fortunately sometimes my wisdom kicks in, sadly sometimes it doesn’t.
    My own limitations will kick in way before the machine's limitations kick in.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

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  5. #54
    Registered User j. condino's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    The point of the Unisaw conversation was never to criticize any one else's choices. It was more that they made so many of them, they are so reliable, and they can often be found much cheaper than a smaller portable saw that it is worth looking out for them.

    Remember the most important large tool mantra:

    Whenever I'm looking at some giant 2000 lb. old bandsaw that I can't hide in the shop, I casually mention to Mrs. C that I was planning on buying a new tool for the shop, but I think my truck is going bad and I may have to buy a new one. After that massive $40K sticker price sets in, let it brew for a few days. The end of the week I mention that I think I'll just do a few repairs on the old truck and ride it out as is... She always comes back with, "That's a great idea...then you'll have plenty of money for the old Unisaw..."

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  7. #55

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    My all original Delta is an 8 1/4 inch homecraft.

  8. #56

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Homecraft was sort of a multi tool as well. Drill press, jointer and saw all shared the same motor. The drill press is highly reccomended and is what I use to drill the headstock. My index is a bit of formica with 1/16 inch pilot holes. I have a removable foot pedal for mine as well.
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  9. #57

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Another Homecraft in action. Please excuse my spelling erors.

  10. #58
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    It's nice to see a drill press that doesn't wobble all over the place.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  11. #59

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeEdgerton View Post
    I'm jealous. I'm just fighting with building a table extension on my new saw.
    Hey Mike, I went through the same process with my cabinet saw. If it's a side extension between the rails, that's a great place for a router table. If outfeed, go torsion box. Even with the minimal webbing I put in this 4' x 4' extension with 1/2" skins- it's extremely rigid. I've stood on top of it and it doesn't give at all. Also, at 36" high it has become my favorite assembly table. In either case, go as big as you can, you'll use it.
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  12. #60
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Roy View Post
    Hey Mike, I went through the same process with my cabinet saw. If it's a side extension between the rails, that's a great place for a router table. If outfeed, go torsion box. Even with the minimal webbing I put in this 4' x 4' extension with 1/2" skins- it's extremely rigid. I've stood on top of it and it doesn't give at all. Also, at 36" high it has become my favorite assembly table. In either case, go as big as you can, you'll use it.
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    I'm seeing a whole lot of people doing the router table thing. I already have a dedicated router table I don't use

    After making every mistake I could possibly make on my first table extension (this one) I'm on extension two and this one will be fine. The first looked OK but I just couldn't get it flat enough. I made the mistake of framing the outside of the top instead of just putting the framing under the top. The bracing was also overkill but I always overbuild.
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    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  13. #61
    Registered User sunburst's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeEdgerton View Post
    I'm seeing a whole lot of people doing the router table thing. I already have a dedicated router table I don't use
    If you do use a router table, the advantage of using the table saw extension for a router table is the use of the table saw fence for the router table, as well as the space saving from not having a dedicated router table. If you don't use a router table then the advantage is irrelevant.

  14. #62
    Registered User j. condino's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    ^ This plus...Depending upon how you build the router extension, you get 1000 lbs of cast iron helping to dampen vibration.

  15. #63
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    You guys are killing me with these nice space to work. I am stuck working off of whatever open piece of floor I can find. Ever hand plane edges sitting on the floor using your feet to hold the board in place? One reason my woodworking has been so slow. At 55 it isn’t as easy to do that anymore. Soon I’ll have more rooms I hope. Heck all the cherry I got is stacked behind my couch and a portable work bench is between the dining kitchen area and living room. My wife is used to it so she doesn’t say anything. She is also ok with me building a workshop now. I can’t wait.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  16. #64
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    The current thing amongst the newer table saw folks is to add the router table. I'm not adverse to it, I'm just not using my router table a whole lot now. There are a few decent router lifts that folks are insetting in extension wings, you can actually buy cast iron wings with the lift built in. The latest amongst the budget crowd is to grab an aluminum Cobalt router table from Lowes that is 27 inches wide and insert the entire table top next to the right hand wing on some of the newer larger but not cabinet saws. Whatever works for you. There are actually some good examples on Youtube. I can add it later if need be. A guy posted a setup this morning on a Facebook group for the Delta 36-725 table saw group that included most of the Rockler catalog.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  17. #65

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    While we are on the subject of changing the subject......

    I use whatever tool I have around the house, buy old yard sale/pawn shop stuff when its cheap, and often modify stuff to suit a certain repair. None of my stuff is worth a fortune, but does the job well.

    +1 on Ryobi stuff, especially older 18v cordless stuff -- used, the blue series -- not so much for precision work, but they are handy and they are old enough that they are dirt cheap at any pawn shop and old enough that generic batteries are 2 for $25 with free shipping on eBay -- I've tried the generic batteries and they work great. My number one tip for Ryobi -- instead of grabbing your chainsaw, get a 18v reciprocating saw with a 9 inch tree blade and a couple batteries and you can do 95% of what a chainsaw can do and it is lighter in weight and less noise and no gas smell....you get the idea -- plus if you are removing tree roots, just stick your blade in the dirt and cut -- something you would never do with a nice chainsaw...just did some yard work this morning with mine.

    same with Dremel -- probably one of the main "power" tools I use for instrument repair, the other 98 percent can be done with hand tools, knives, sandpaper, files, etc., IMHO.

  18. #66
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    I ordered a 15" Powermatic planer today. I have been watching for used tools but what has come up has not been what I can use. There was some three-phase stuff, and I am not averse to three-phase other than I do not have three-phase at home and the power company would need to do a lot of cable pulling to get it to me apparently so it wasn't an option. Too bad really since that equipment was pretty nice and quite reasonably priced. I work on industrial equipment for a living so I'm more than familiar with it. Sadly I was actually looking for a drill press but now that I have 400 bdft of ruff sawn lumber to process I decided the planer was a better and more needed item for me. I haven't used a drill press in 20 years so a few more won't be a big change. Now that I buy larger quantities of lumber doing it by hand just isn't something I want to do. I don't mind a board of two but this is a lot of hardwood and would take me too long to process with hand tools. Thanks again for all the feedback I really appreciate it!
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

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  20. #67
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bertotti View Post
    I ordered a 15" Powermatic planer today. I have been watching for used tools but what has come up has not been what I can use. There was some three-phase stuff, and I am not averse to three-phase other than I do not have three-phase at home and the power company would need to do a lot of cable pulling to get it to me apparently so it wasn't an option. Too bad really since that equipment was pretty nice and quite reasonably priced. I work on industrial equipment for a living so I'm more than familiar with it. Sadly I was actually looking for a drill press but now that I have 400 bdft of ruff sawn lumber to process I decided the planer was a better and more needed item for me. I haven't used a drill press in 20 years so a few more won't be a big change. Now that I buy larger quantities of lumber doing it by hand just isn't something I want to do. I don't mind a board of two but this is a lot of hardwood and would take me too long to process with hand tools. Thanks again for all the feedback I really appreciate it!
    You're not doing that inside the house are you?
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  21. #68
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeEdgerton View Post
    You're not doing that inside the house are you?
    Yes, I am. I work wherever there is a little space. I built my first ten-string in a bath tube with a board set across the sides as a workbench and pillows in the bottom. Mostly a comfortable place to sit but working was a challenge. I don't use my table saw much anymore it creates way too much dust and we do have an issue with that. I bought a Festool track saw and dust collector years ago and process most of my wood with it. It literally leaves almost now dust. I upgraded my sanding last year with their RO90 and RO 150. I'll never go back to my belt sander if I don't have to. I sanded the kitchen floor with the 150 and there was no dust in the air. NONE! The belt sanders left a fog throughout the whole house. This planer should be just as clean with my bigger dust collector connected to it, if not up goes the plastic walls for a short time. I dream of the day I can build a real workshop on my land. I have always done my hobby work for people for free and materials if needed. Now I started telling people no more I need to be paid. Literally, multiple thousands of dollars in work over the years to help people out and hardly ever thanks and no reciprocation when I need help. So if they want me to help they can pay. I tell you it is funny how many people were fair-weather friends but once they can't use you anymore you're dead to them. My closest friends always offered to pay or helped me in other ways and they still get me help whenever they need it. Joe shmoe neighbor up the road who hears I'll do it for nothing doesn't get it for anything anymore. Probably should be a new thread on how to value your time. I can't be the only person to fall into that trap. Sadly it took me 45 of my 55 years to figure that out. I get a bit discussed at times if I think of how much easier my earlier life would have been if I worked smarter and knew how to put value to my time.

    I have a 10x12 shed outside that is getting a second floor this year. I hope to move into the ground floor of that little space shortly or frame in a real, isolated, workshop in my basement. I have the wife's approval to do so if I choose to. Of course, it doesn't hurt that currently, I have two portable workbenches set up between the living and dining rooms, she would be glad to see them gone. Like I mentioned either earlier here or in another thread. I have routinely hand-planed boards while sitting on the floor holding the board with my feet. I was doing that up until a couple of years ago. I'm moving up in the world now!
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

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  23. #69

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeEdgerton View Post
    I'm seeing a whole lot of people doing the router table thing. I already have a dedicated router table I don't use

    After making every mistake I could possibly make on my first table extension (this one) I'm on extension two and this one will be fine. The first looked OK but I just couldn't get it flat enough. I made the mistake of framing the outside of the top instead of just putting the framing under the top. The bracing was also overkill but I always overbuild.
    The secret to lasting rigidity is plywood ribs, the more plies the better. And putting a skin on the bottom which essentially creates a bunch of I-beams. I have a buddy who does high end custom work with commercial accounts at the big suppliers, so I have access to lots of materials I normally wouldn't be able to get. He gets this Russian version of Baltic birch ply that has like a dozen layers of veneer in it. There was a 3/4" off-cut from a piece of 3/4" plywood in his trash. Just for kicks I tried breaking it over the corner of a bench. I couldn't even bend it putting all my weight on it!

  24. #70
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    6-8 weeks before I thought it would happen the planer showed up at the equipment store. I am now impatiently awaiting their delivery. Probably tomorrow or the day after. Kind of slid off the drilling jig topic didn't I. I am eyeballing a nice drill press but this has to be paid for first. I have luckily had some inquiries about how much Cherry I will have left. I hope it generates some requests for paid builds. I would be thrilled if a few projects paid for my equipment quickly.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

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  26. #71
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Roy View Post
    The secret to lasting rigidity is plywood ribs, the more plies the better. And putting a skin on the bottom which essentially creates a bunch of I-beams. I have a buddy who does high end custom work with commercial accounts at the big suppliers, so I have access to lots of materials I normally wouldn't be able to get. He gets this Russian version of Baltic birch ply that has like a dozen layers of veneer in it. There was a 3/4" off-cut from a piece of 3/4" plywood in his trash. Just for kicks I tried breaking it over the corner of a bench. I couldn't even bend it putting all my weight on it!
    I always keep birch plywood cutoffs. My problem wasn't really rigidity it was keeping the table top flat. It started out that way, I just messed that up trying to get it even with the frame. I just didn't think it through. I have one source for Baltic Birch plywood that is near me. Great stuff.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  27. #72
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    I had a place here that carried baltic birch void-free 12 layers. It wasn't 4x8 but some odd size. I think they imported it in the European size. but it has since been replaced by Baltic birch in a 4x8 sheet that has about half the layers and doesn't say if it is void-free or not. I imagine if I want the good stuff it will need to be ordered and shipped. Prices currently are insane. What's with the prices now. I saw a sheet of ply I would have paid 7.50 for a year ago going for almost 25$ a sheet now. Highway robbery in my book.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  28. #73

    Default Re: Headstock drilling jig.

    Mr. Dulak's Peg head drilling jig shows in this video. Other techniques have changed a lot since the Mid Missouri days.


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