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Thread: two part epoxy

  1. #1
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default two part epoxy

    I people using it for inlay and counter tops and all sorts of stuff. I wonder has anyone made their own colored binding with it?
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

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  2. #2
    Registered User Mandobart's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Boy I wouldn't. The only use for epoxy is to fix something you NEVER want to be able to take apart or remove. There's almost nothing you want to use epoxy for on an instrument.

  3. #3
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Ah, but there is the catch. I wouldn’t pour it into where binding goes but make a mold and mold a binding from it then glue it in traditionally if that’s possible.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  4. #4
    Registered User slimt's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bertotti View Post
    Ah, but there is the catch. I wouldn’t pour it into where binding goes but make a mold and mold a binding from it then glue it in traditionally if that’s possible.
    Theres a task. You might be better off taking a thickness measurement and make a hat strip out of aluminum , take a mold from that. Then brace the back so it does not twist. the mold. Then resin with dye into the mold.

  5. #5
    Registered User j. condino's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Plenty of people in the guitar building community use epoxy to make their own binding strips as well as reproduction pickguards.

    I know of one well known company that used a liquid acrylic type plastic to make cream colored binding. Route the channel, make a "dam" along the edge out of tape, squeeze on the plastic goop, wait overnight until cured, pull away tape, and scrape until level. 'Works great....until a few years later when everything shrinks.....

    After having worked on two modern Martin guitars this week with all of the plastic binding literally falling off, I'll stick with wood binding and hot hide glue!

  6. #6
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Quote Originally Posted by j. condino View Post
    Plenty of people in the guitar building community use epoxy to make their own binding strips as well as reproduction pickguards.

    I know of one well known company that used a liquid acrylic type plastic to make cream colored binding. Route the channel, make a "dam" along the edge out of tape, squeeze on the plastic goop, wait overnight until cured, pull away tape, and scrape until level. 'Works great....until a few years later when everything shrinks.....

    After having worked on two modern Martin guitars this week with all of the plastic binding literally falling off, I'll stick with wood binding and hot hide glue!
    I knew plastics shrank with age but two part epoxy does as well? I wonder what that means for people using it in their instruments. Inlays popping out in 5-10 years?
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Epoxy is fairly brittle. I would be concerned about it shattering with impacts that plastic or wood binding would bounce back from. Also it will give less with seasonal movements which could present a problem.

  8. #8
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    Interesting. I am using it on counter tops now and it seems pretty durable but I can see the seasonal change thing being an issue with those who do not maintain a fairly constant humidity.
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  9. #9
    Registered User slimt's Avatar
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    Default Re: two part epoxy

    I have a couple different types of 2 part resins here. When these dry. There not brittle unless the mix is wrong. On one product if you pour to thick. It traps the center from gassing off. And stays soft. I could make another piece set it out side for a month and see what it does for shrinkage and cracking.
    I could make a strip ad the dyes to a mix. Dry it off and see if it can be flexed under a heat gun to bend.
    I have no clue what Im doing. And the info is vague. I dont even know who to ask for info. Its been trial and error and expense.

    Or find your choice of material and get C N C ed

  10. #10

    Default Re: two part epoxy

    There are a lot of different epoxies. My carbon fiber mandolins are entirely made of epoxy, if you want to think about it that way... so it's not so much about the material, but about the right material for the job. "Epoxy" is about as specific as "wood", there's a lot of variation and lot of ways to do it wrong within that label, and a lot of ways to do it right.

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