Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

  1. #1

    Default Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

    Hi!

    Does someone here know what Gibson model this is?

    https://imgur.com/a/SVC1R2Q

    If you also know what price range you would guess it belonged in, that would be great.

  2. #2
    Registered User grassrootphilosopher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,856

    Default Re: Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

    Quote Originally Posted by almond View Post
    Hi!

    Does someone here know what Gibson model this is?

    https://imgur.com/a/SVC1R2Q

    If you also know what price range you would guess it belonged in, that would be great.
    Looks like itīs a 30ies Gibson A-50 (with replaced tuners). As the fretboard is glued to the top (like roundhole Gibson mandolins) the sound may be nice but it will lack power. They can be nice mandolins though.
    Olaf

  3. The following members say thank you to grassrootphilosopher for this post:


  4. #3
    Registered User grassrootphilosopher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,856

    Default Re: Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

    Ok, it could also be a late 30ies A-00 (same as A-1 before it went to have the wide bell body). But the script in the back of the headstock seems to indicate otherwise (albeit itīs not original to the instrument of course but maybe painted on by the first owner on the receipt of the instrument in 1935...)

    I was astonished to find an A-00 online at Carter Vintage for allmost 2 k. I find that is way too much for such an instrument (https://cartervintage.com/collection...bson-a-00-1939). I am not aux courant when it comes to instrument prices but it seems that the prices for "lower" vintage mandolins seem to have increased in the last couple of years.

    If the instrument in "your" picture sounds good and has no repairs or other structural issues I woult think that 1.500,- USD is the highest that one should pay for such an instrument.

    There is one "of these" at Fred Osterīs shop for 1.350,- USD (https://vintage-instruments.com/shop...mandolin-1937/), a wide body A-1 for 1.250,- USD and a flatback A-00 for less than 1 k.

    Also read this: https://www.mandolincafe.com/news/pu...s_001443.shtml
    Olaf

  5. The following members say thank you to grassrootphilosopher for this post:


  6. #4

    Default Re: Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

    Thanks for the info grassrootphilosopher!

  7. #5
    Teacher, luthier
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Southeast Tennessee
    Posts
    2,733

    Default Re: Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

    The distinctions between the A-1, the A-00, and A-50 during this period are rather blurry, because Gibson was changing the specs on these models constantly, and not every instrument conformed exactly to the catalog descriptions.

    If the mandolin was indeed built in 1935, the combination of f-holes, carved maple back, unbound fingerboard, and standard size body with bound top and back are most consistent with the specs for the A-1 in that year.

    If the mandolin has a factory order number visible through the soundhole, the presence of a letter "A" would confirm a construction date of 1935.
    My reference for the above information is "Gruhn's Guide to Vintage Guitars," 2nd edition.

    And yes, prices are starting to rise on many old instruments in good original condition after a long period of stagnation. $2000 for a '30's f-hole A model is pushing it, though.

  8. #6
    Registered User Geno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    McGaheysville, Virginia
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: Do you know the model of this 1935 Gibson?

    Yep, I once had a 1934 A-1 that had the exact same features as your mandolin (except the replacement tuners). Note that the sunburst top, (but not back) and 20's style tail piece are also typical of the A-1. Keep in mind that an "A" suffix would confirm an early 1935 FON, the designation then apparently disappeared sometime later in 1935, according to Spann. So, it could be possible to have a FON with no "A" and still be from late 1935.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •