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Thread: How to play these notes?

  1. #1

    Default How to play these notes?

    Good morning, i just started to play songs following the instruction of <Mandolin For Dummies-Wiley (2020)>

    However, i couldn't play these parts as the example mp3 sounded.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    example mp3:

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-IL...ew?usp=sharing

  2. #2
    Professional Dreamer journeybear's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    These are double stops, in which the lead figure is being played on two strings instead of one. Best approach is to separate the two - play each single note melody separately - then combine. This example is easier than most, as the higher line is just the open A string. So play the lower line by itself on the D string - and when comfortable with that, add in the open A string. The tab is straightforward: E G F# E
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  3. #3
    Registered User Louise NM's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    They're double stops, where you are picking and fingering two notes at once. The top notes are the open A strings, the bottom notes, E, G, F#, E, will be played on the D strings, fingered 1, 3, 2, 1. Practice playing just the four As, then just the notes on the D strings, then put them together, moving the pick through all four A and E strings. The third and fourth lines have more of the same on the As and Es.

    The tricky part is learning to finger the notes on the D course without your fingers touching the A strings and killing their sound.

    EDIT: Just like Journeybear said while I was still typing!

  4. #4

    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    Thanks , it seems like more practice is waiting for me

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    Double stops like this are actually a gift to the learner.

    First:
    You only have to finger one note at a time because the other note is an open string. In part one it's the open A string and in part two it's the open E string.

    Second:
    The melody in each case is in the lower string, the one you are fingering. So, while you are working at not accidentally damping the open string on the double-stops, you are still hearing the melody.

    Three:
    The challenge is to let the open string ring without damping it accidentally with your fretting hand. Looking at it from the opposite hand, if your picking hand is less than precise and you hit the open A string accidentally while playing the lower note, it's still part of a double-stop harmony. That is what I mean by a "gift" and a great way to get started on double-stops and a fuller sound.

    Four:
    Whoever devised this arrangement is a good teacher, also making the double stop section mostly full quarter-notes so giving you more time to get it right. They introduce the eighth-note double stops only in the last bars of each section, on all open strings so you have one less thing to concentrate on while getting your picking hand playing correctly.
    Bren

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  7. #6
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bren View Post
    Double stops like this are actually a gift to the learner.

    First:
    You only have to finger one note at a time because the other note is an open string. In part one it's the open A string and in part two it's the open E string.

    Second:
    The melody in each case is in the lower string, the one you are fingering. So, while you are working at not accidentally damping the open string on the double-stops, you are still hearing the melody.

    Three:
    The challenge is to let the open string ring without damping it accidentally with your fretting hand. Looking at it from the opposite hand, if your picking hand is less than precise and you hit the open A string accidentally while playing the lower note, it's still part of a double-stop harmony. That is what I mean by a "gift" and a great way to get started on double-stops and a fuller sound.

    Four:
    Whoever devised this arrangement is a good teacher, also making the double stop section mostly full quarter-notes so giving you more time to get it right. They introduce the eighth-note double stops only in the last bars of each section, on all open strings so you have one less thing to concentrate on while getting your picking hand playing correctly.
    Don Julin.
    I forgot I had this book. I've practiced the Baron Collins-Hill version of this tune. I think I'll try this exercise in my practice today.

  8. #7

    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bren View Post
    Double stops like this are actually a gift to the learner.

    First:
    You only have to finger one note at a time because the other note is an open string. In part one it's the open A string and in part two it's the open E string.

    Second:
    The melody in each case is in the lower string, the one you are fingering. So, while you are working at not accidentally damping the open string on the double-stops, you are still hearing the melody.

    Three:
    The challenge is to let the open string ring without damping it accidentally with your fretting hand. Looking at it from the opposite hand, if your picking hand is less than precise and you hit the open A string accidentally while playing the lower note, it's still part of a double-stop harmony. That is what I mean by a "gift" and a great way to get started on double-stops and a fuller sound.

    Four:
    Whoever devised this arrangement is a good teacher, also making the double stop section mostly full quarter-notes so giving you more time to get it right. They introduce the eighth-note double stops only in the last bars of each section, on all open strings so you have one less thing to concentrate on while getting your picking hand playing correctly.

    And i will definitely cherish this great gift

  9. #8
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    “I couldn’t play these parts as the example … sounded”

    For the beginner, this usually means that you’re having trouble with your finger(s), on the fretted notes, muting the open strings. If that is the case, first, know that this is common. Second, practice placing a finger and playing both strings, making adjustments until both pairs of strings sound clearly.

    This takes time and practice and my not be easy in the beginning, but do spend some of your practice time working on this until you can get it. Then, when you are ready to practice the whole passage, practice it very, very slowly until you can make the strings ring clearly.

    Over time, these type of doublestops will come easily.
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  11. #9

    Default Re: How to play these notes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gunter View Post
    “I couldn’t play these parts as the example … sounded”

    For the beginner, this usually means that you’re having trouble with your finger(s), on the fretted notes, muting the open strings. If that is the case, first, know that this is common. Second, practice placing a finger and playing both strings, making adjustments until both pairs of strings sound clearly.

    This takes time and practice and my not be easy in the beginning, but do spend some of your practice time working on this until you can get it. Then, when you are ready to practice the whole passage, practice it very, very slowly until you can make the strings ring clearly.

    Over time, these type of doublestops will come easily.

    Then i will try to slow the BPM.

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