Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 29 of 29

Thread: Cape Breton mandolin (1976)

  1. #26
    Registered User Kirk Higgins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Cape Breton mandolin (1976)

    In the 70’s, I had the privilege of hearing John Allan perform at my neighbor’s house when I was living in Truro, NS. Including John Allan, there were four of us. It was a true pleasure to meet and listen to him play the tunes and songs he wanted to play on his Martin 12 string. He stayed with my neighbor when performing in Truro.

    I had been to Dave MacIsaac’s place in Halifax many years back. I purchased and my daughter still has the Gibson LG-3 he used when touring with Natalie MacMaster. I believe he has been living in Halifax for many years. I don’t recall ever hearing that Jerry Holland was living in Halifax but it certainly is possible. Like Ronald mentioned, I think he lived in the Sydney area of Cape Breton but certainly performed in Halifax from time to time.

    With global urbanization, many (most) of the young people have had to leave rural areas for the larger cities. In Atlantic Canada this has been Halifax and outside Atlantic, our young people have traditionally gone to Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.

  2. The following members say thank you to Kirk Higgins for this post:

    Ranald 

  3. #27
    Registered User Ranald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: Cape Breton mandolin (1976)

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Higgins View Post
    With global urbanization, many (most) of the young people have had to leave rural areas for the larger cities. In Atlantic Canada this has been Halifax and outside Atlantic, our young people have traditionally gone to Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.
    And, in my parents' and grandparents' generations, Boston, New York, Montreal, Hamilton, Detroit and Windsor (the two cities both having auto plants), where my father moved with the family. These were mostly cities with a great deal of industry and plenty of jobs, paying better than most work back home.
    Robert Johnson's mother, describing blues musicians:
    "I never did have no trouble with him until he got big enough to be round with bigger boys and off from home. Then he used to follow all these harp blowers, mandoleen (sic) and guitar players."
    Lomax, Alan, The Land where The Blues Began, NY: Pantheon, 1993, p.14.

  4. #28
    Registered User JH Murray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Burnstown Ontario Canada
    Posts
    794

    Default Re: Cape Breton mandolin (1976)

    I live in the Ottawa Valley, which straddles the border between Ontario & Quebec. The Ottawa River area was a rich source of lumber, and it brought together the French, Irish, Scots and English. It also produced a unique fiddling tradition. The bagpipe tradition is all gone now. Like Cape Breton, it has an expressive style that is tied to dance. Reading the article Dagger Gordon shared reminded me of a quote from a British philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Whitehead said the art of progress is to hang on to stability in the face of change, and to embrace change in the face of stability. It's fascinating to see how Scottish and Irish traditional music has changed, and now the new world is seen as a way of reconnecting with their roots. This is a video of April Verch, an Ottawa Valley fiddler and dancer. Enjoy.

  5. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to JH Murray For This Useful Post:


  6. #29
    Registered User Ranald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: Cape Breton mandolin (1976)

    Thanks for that, JH, There's a real French-Canadian accent on the tune. I first saw and heard April when she was about 14, fiddling and dancing in the aisles between periods at a 67s game. She was part of the official entertainment, and was certainly good. April was immersed in folk fiddling, but is also a sophisticated, formally-trained musician as well, a Berklee graduate(or at least a Berkelee student) in fact.

    https://aprilverch.com/about/
    Robert Johnson's mother, describing blues musicians:
    "I never did have no trouble with him until he got big enough to be round with bigger boys and off from home. Then he used to follow all these harp blowers, mandoleen (sic) and guitar players."
    Lomax, Alan, The Land where The Blues Began, NY: Pantheon, 1993, p.14.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •