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Thread: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

  1. #1

    Default Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    I expect this is not too rare but interesting all the same:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/22463387239...wAAOSwsxNhWkea

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  3. #2
    Registered User Charles E.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    Wow, 19 bids and it almost up to $225.00. Someone wants it.
    Charley

    A bunch of stuff with four strings

  4. #3
    FIDDLES with STRADOLINS your_diamond's Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    Wow! There is a Style "O" guitar listed in that catalogue ...they weren't made until 1908.

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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    So were those photo's? Because it would be hard for an artist to get the detail that well.

  6. #5
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    Somewhere here I believe we have a JPG of each page of one of the early catalogs near that age. It's been years since I've seen it.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

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  8. #6

    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    The illustrations are probably what is known as scraperboard or scratchboard. You don't see it much these days but it was once commonplace.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratchboard

    From the above link:

    "It allowed for a fine line appearance that could be photographically reduced for reproduction without losing quality. It was most effective and expeditious for use in single-color book and newspaper printing. From the 1930s to 1950s, it was one of the preferred techniques for medical, scientific and product illustration."

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  10. #7
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    Just for posterity - final selling price was $1,200.00.

    Wow.

  11. #8
    Professional Dreamer journeybear's Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    On a somewhat related note, I hope someone who frequents threads of this nature can help answer a question. I see in these pages that all mandolin models have tops and backs made of maple, the exception being the F model, which uses curly maple. This includes the plain A as well as higher-priced A models. It aligns with what I have long believed, that plain A's were made with the same materials and craftsmanship as more expensive models, and thus were desirable targets of bidding online (or however one might go about buying one). This also comports with a recently published notice of a plain A for sale at Gryphon, which avers that same claim. However, I saw somewhere in these pages sometime in the past month or so a post which provided a chart displaying the different woods used for different models - in great detail, as to typed of wood and grain count - with a much greater variation than I had long believed. That was a bit confusing, as was the ad posted this week by Gryphon, taking into consideration the information in that chart.

    So I wonder if someone can clear that up. One or the other can be true, not both. Perhaps that chart was from a later time, so both can be true, just not at the same time. I'm going to search for that chart, though I'm not sure how. If anyone knows, please do tell. I'll wager I'm not the only one who'd like to know. Thanks!
    But that's just my opinion. I could be wrong. - Dennis Miller

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  12. #9

    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    That winning bid of $1,200 as mentioned above, is something else.

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  14. #10
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    Here's something else, similar: Gibson Mandolin Guitar Company SOUNDING BOARD SALESMAN.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/11504802042...AAAOSwbdVhabsb

    Currently $20 - Will it spike as high?

    I'd be great fun to look through something like this, but I would never fork out as much dough as the catalog went for.

  15. #11
    Registered User Timbofood's Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    I used to work with a guy that had amassed quite a collection of both original and reprints of those catalogs and a few “Soundingboard Salesman” literature. As well as some Vega literature as well. I wonder if he still has them? They were fascinating to look through!
    Timothy F. Lewis
    "If brains was lard, that boy couldn't grease a very big skillet" J.D. Clampett

  16. #12
    Registered User Charles E.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Early 1900s Gibson Catalogue

    Quote Originally Posted by journeybear View Post
    On a somewhat related note, I hope someone who frequents threads of this nature can help answer a question. I see in these pages that all mandolin models have tops and backs made of maple, the exception being the F model, which uses curly maple. This includes the plain A as well as higher-priced A models.
    JB The backs and sides would be "maple" the top would be spruce but you knew that.
    It has always been my understanding that the A models up thru the A-3, as well as the F-2 used birch for the back and sides (lots to be had in northern Michigan) and that flamed maple was reserved for the A-4, F-4 and F-5 mandolins.
    Last edited by Charles E.; Oct-18-2021 at 3:28pm.
    Charley

    A bunch of stuff with four strings

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