Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    I need your help with the following...I have a Y25K (Weber) Mandolin...I have developed RA Arthritis in my left hand. My hands are small and that further completes things.

    Does anybody have any suggestions for type of strings (guages) and other thing I can do to continue playing this Mandolin.

    Does anyone have any suggestions on a new or used Mandolin F-5 with a narrow neck for about $1000.0O

    Any help would be appreciated!

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Mandolin user MontanaMatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Posts
    1,139

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    Sorry to hear that you are struggling.
    Light strings can reduce finger pressure requirements. Has the mandolin been “set up”? If the action (string heights, bridge height, neck angle) is off, it can make fretting very uncomfortable.
    If you are going to switch to light strings, get it setup after choosing your new string package, as the tension of different strings can affect the setup. A fresh setup and light strings could afford you a more comfortable mandolin.
    Best wishes

    Ps hopefully another member can suggest a good set of “light” strings for a flattop Weber…
    2007 Weber Custom Elite "old wood"
    2017 Ratliff R5 Custom #1148
    Several nice old Fiddles
    2007 Martin 000-15S 12 fret Auditorium-slot head
    Deering Classic Open Back
    Too many microphones

    BridgerCreekBoys.com

  3. #3

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    Eastman probably has the narrowest spec for width at the nut (1 3/32”) in current production that you’d find new (below $1k). Whether that neck would be easier or not is a different matter. You might call a shop like TMS and talk to someone about their experiences with customers, and if setting up those models with lighter strings works. It may be necessary to consider something with a different style. Good luck.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    There was a recent thread that touched on this same subject, but I can’t find it quickly. A job for the moderator.

  5. #5
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    3,423

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy L. View Post
    Does anybody have any suggestions for type of strings (guages) and other thing I can do to continue playing this Mandolin.
    If you don’t mind the expense, you might consider a flatwound string from Thomastik-Infeld. I typically have used the mediums (mittels) on flattops, but you could try the light (weich) set. If you get really desperate, you could even remove one string from each pair.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy L. View Post
    Does anyone have any suggestions on a new or used Mandolin F-5 with a narrow neck for about $1000.0O
    Assuming string tension is an issue, I can’t imagine a situation in which an archtop is a better alternative to a flattop. If it’s more a matter of neck profile and nut width, then I’d say the Eastman 315 is most often recommended in that price range.
    1924 Gibson A Snakehead
    2005 National RM-1
    2007 Hester A5
    2009 Passernig A5
    2015 Black A2-z
    2010 Black GBOM
    2017 Poe Scout
    2014 Smart F-Style Mandola
    2018 Vessel TM5
    2019 Hogan F5

  6. #6
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    3,423

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by pheffernan View Post
    Assuming string tension is an issue, I can’t imagine a situation in which an archtop is a better alternative to a flattop. If it’s more a matter of neck profile and nut width, then I’d say the Eastman 315 is most often recommended in that price range.
    This one is listed as mint for newly half your budget:

    https://www.mandolincafe.com/ads/177484#177484
    1924 Gibson A Snakehead
    2005 National RM-1
    2007 Hester A5
    2009 Passernig A5
    2015 Black A2-z
    2010 Black GBOM
    2017 Poe Scout
    2014 Smart F-Style Mandola
    2018 Vessel TM5
    2019 Hogan F5

  7. #7
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alvarado/Mansfield, Texas
    Posts
    4,039

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    A proper setup is crucial - crucial - IMO you should get your instrument setup with as low an action as possible. Light gauge strings may help a little. Regarding technique, you should practice on using the least amount of fretting pressure possible, and keeping your hands as relaxed as possible, using just enough pressure to get a clean note, and no more. Excess pressure adds nothing except tension and eventually pain, it is useless musically.

    Another important tip is to speak with your physician about your playing. I wouldn’t want to encourage you to injure yourself, but my own testimonial is that playing fretted instruments helps with my arthritis because it helps me to maintain and even increase my range of motion. However it does nothing to alleviate the pain. I can play with manageable pain, and as long as I’m not injuring myself both my range of motion and my finger strength benefits greatly. I suffer from psoriatic rather than rheumatoid arthritis, so discuss potential risks & benefits with your physician.
    WWW.MARKGUNTER.NET
    ----------------------------------
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN

    ----------------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Blues Mando
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  8. #8
    coprolite mandroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Outer Spiral Arm, of Galaxy, NW Oregon.
    Posts
    16,671

    Question Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    Sorry, a Mechanic ..
    Gages are measured numbers US ..010"(.254mm) usually called a 10 for the E..


    lighter, a 9, heavier an 11 or 11.5..
    sets; proportional 9~32, 10~36, 11~38 or 40 .. some a 41 ..

    What the wound wires are wound with, is another variable
    your D & G .. Nickel or bronze most common ..


    writing about music
    is like dancing,
    about architecture

  9. #9
    Registered User Cheryl Watson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    St. Augustine, Florida, USA
    Posts
    1,365

    Default Re: Suggestions for types strings and a mandolin

    If your Weber has excellent fretwork and a great setup, you can go with Thomastik-Infeld strings. They are the easiest I have played (on someone else's mandolin), but they will sound less bright and you will loose volume. They are very gentle on the fingers. The best set-up you can get from a very good luthier who has mega experience setting up mandolins and the Thomastik-Infelds are the best you can do other than buying a very expensive extremely easy to play instrument. Also, I would practice fretting as lightly as possible, still getting clear notes. Sometimes a smaller nut and smaller neck profile can work, but it also could cramp your hand more and have a detrimental effect. There is no way of knowing unless you play several mandolins with different nut widths and neck profiles and see what works best for you. The combination of the nut width and neck profile is really important. Most wider nut mandolins have a slightly fuller neck profile. If you have a very small profile neck (shallow, not just V'ed) then it can cramp your hand. I know, I have very small hands. I will tell you that the neck profile that works best for me is by Tom Ellis and the specs for his necks are on his website. If you love your Weber's tone, you can also have a professional luthier re-shape the neck but you have to know the specs that work best for you. Buying another mandolin for around $1,000 probably won't get you a very playable neck and great fretwork. There probably are exceptions of which I am unaware. The Webers I have played had very good fretwork which matters very much. Just the opinion of someone with small hands who is obsessed with mandolins and also teaches mandolin.

  10. The following members say thank you to Cheryl Watson for this post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •