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Thread: compared to a Weber mandolin.

  1. #1

    Default compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I have a 2004 Weber Gallatin model mahogany back and sides spruce top that I would like to trade for something with a wider neck, and classier look. I don't want to sacrifice on sound, and without much difference in my trade price. does anyone here have any suggestions? I've looked at the Eastman just havent played one.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Tell us what your trade price is and if a F5-style is preferred. I would not suggest an Eastman superior to a Gallatin tone wise.
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  4. #3

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I paid $1,800 15 years ago, so I'm guessing 1,000. I've tried to find some for sale on line, but haven't seen many. the other problem is here in central Indiana we don't have stores with a wide variety of mandolins to do any trading with, so i don't trust them to be able to give me an honest answer.

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    Registered User Jill McAuley's Avatar
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I'm not aware of Eastmans with wider necks and I agree with mando-bob, I don't think it would be an upward move on the mandolin food chain to go from an Eastman to a Weber - not dissing Eastmans by the way. Collings mandolins commonly come with the wide neck option so you may have luck finding a second hand Collings that fits your needs but you'd definitely need to do cash + trade to acquire one, given the prices second hand Collings mandolins are going for nowadays.
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  6. #5

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    going to take a look right now thank you!

  7. #6

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    what does any one feel about Kentucky mandolins or Michael Kelly?

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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Definitely not Michael Kelly. They made an occasional gem but overall were overbuilt, though they do look pretty. Kentucky’s upper tier models are well regarded, but, again, wouldn’t consider them and upgrade to a Weber. Maybe look for a Silverangel Econo. They’re $1600 new and are made with more traditional woods, typically.

    Good luck! Unfortunately, your Gallatin is one mandolin often recommended as a step up from the other brands you’ve mentioned thus far…
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I would put them on par with Eastman and a step down from the Weber. I think you'll end up needing to put a little cash together with the Weber as the Gallatin line was pretty basic and a wide neck is usually an upcharge.
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dconaway View Post
    what does any one feel about Kentucky mandolins or Michael Kelly?
    I don't feel these are going to give you the sound of your Weber. You may try and look for a Silver Angel, tho I am not sure how many were made with a wider nut. A Morris may also be another choice. They are both small builder hand made mandolins and used near your price range.
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    Registered User Charles E.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    +1 for the Silver Angel econo. There is one in the classifieds at the moment. Just buy it and sell the Weber. Trades are difficult to say the least.

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    Last edited by Charles E.; Aug-04-2022 at 5:27pm.
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    In short, even the lowest tier Weber will be a considerably better instrument than any Michael Kelly instrument.
    I don't know what kind of sound you're going for, but when I think of "wide fingerboard" in a modest price range, the first thing I think of is one of the plainer old oval hole Gibson models. They can still be found in good condition starting at $1200 and go up from there depending on model, condition, and who is selling it. You might want to budget an extra $300 for a set of modern frets.

    I don't know if such a thing would fit the kind of music you like, it's just another idea to throw into the arena.
    Last edited by rcc56; Aug-04-2022 at 5:49pm.

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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Quote Originally Posted by mando-bob View Post
    Tell us what your trade price is and if a F5-style is preferred. I would not suggest an Eastman superior to a Gallatin tone wise.
    Neither would I. I have found the Weber Gallatin mandolin and mandolas to compare tone wise with any of the upscale Webers, though minus the bling. at least so with the Bruce Weber models. Can't speak for "The Old Hippie" (or what they are now called) builders.
    Keep in mind Eastmans provide a huge bang for the buck.
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  15. #13

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    That's what I have noted about the eastman, but loosing tone is a big deal. I played one years ago and liked it, but I was playing an Alvarez at the time. It's hard because as mandolin players we don't have the same access to instruments as do guitar players.

  16. #14

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I may have to look in that direction. I keep hoping Isomeone donates one to goodwill and I find it, but fat chance.

  17. #15

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Thank you I'll take a look!

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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I own both a Kentucky and a Weber, the Weber is WAY better than the Kentucky (tone-wise,) although the Kentucky is a nice instrument. IMHO, the neck is not wider in the Kentucky, although I have never actually measured the necks, but they feel pretty much the same in my hand.

  19. #17

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    I'm seeing a pattern here and guess I'll be keeping my Weber. I won't sacrifice sound for looks !

  20. #18
    Registered User Marcus CA's Avatar
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dconaway View Post
    I paid $1,800 15 years ago, so I'm guessing 1,000. I've tried to find some for sale on line, but haven't seen many. the other problem is here in central Indiana we don't have stores with a wide variety of mandolins to do any trading with, so i don't trust them to be able to give me an honest answer.
    In general, used mandolins in good condition these days are selling for a minimum of 3/4 of the current retail price. In your case, the problem is that Two Old Hippies has "temporarily" stopped producing Webers, so there hasn't been a current retail price for over a year. I'd guess that the retail price of the last Gallatin F's was at least $2,400 --- I just realized that you never said whether your Gallatin has an A-body or an F-body --- which means that a used one should go for at least $1,800. Because they are no longer being built, that factor could even add a little to that.

    If you want to trade it in at a store, they won't give you that full amount in store credit, and I really don't know what percent they would give you. They might also offer to sell it on consignment, in which case, you'd probably get 70-80% of the sale price. If you don't trust the stores in your area, you might call Elderly in Michigan and/or The Mandolin Store in Tennessee to find out what they'd sell it for, and what you would net from that. You'd have to include the shipping cost in that calculation, as well.

    You've unsuccessfully tried to find some for sale on line, which is generally the case with the Gallatins and the Bitterroots --- which indicates how happy players generally are with them. (Disclosure: my main mando since 2011 has been a Yellowstone, and my only mandocello since 2009 has been a Gallatin.)

    If you are looking for a wider neck, you absolutely won't want an Eastman, since they generally come with a 1 3/32" neck, which is narrower than the standard 1 1/8". BTW, the Silverangel that Charles E. flagged for you probably sounds better than the Eastmans at that price point, but its nut is the standard width.

    All in all, I agree with the others who have said that you probably aren't going to be able to find a mandolin that satisfies all of your criteria at the Gallatin's price point. You may want to do some research into the prices of the mandolins that would give you everything that you want, and then consider saving up a while for that upgrade --- although the longer that takes, the more likely you'll have to factor in price increases as well, unfortunately.
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    If you're wanting a good quality mando with a wide fingerboard, you might keep your eyes peeled for made in USA Breedloves.
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Someone mentioned it in another thread but a second hand Northfield might tick the boxes for the OP since there are wide nut models to be found.
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve L View Post
    If you're wanting a good quality mando with a wide fingerboard, you might keep your eyes peeled for made in USA Breedloves.
    I agree completely that the old USA Breedloves had the best tone at their price point 10-15 years ago, and were widely available with the wide nut. I upgraded from a Kentucky KM250SC to a Breedlove Quartz OF back then, and that was a major step up! Personally, though, I'd consider the Quartz OF and even the FF to be a step down in tone from a Gallatin --- which at that time, were twice as expensive as the OF.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jill McAuley View Post
    Someone mentioned it in another thread but a second hand Northfield might tick the boxes for the OP since there are wide nut models to be found.
    I agree that Northfield often produces wide-nut instruments, but I've never been a fan of their standard NF-F5. I really like their Big Mon, but that's at a much higher price point.
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    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Don't think you'll find an F style with a wide neck at the price point you'd want. You should be able to find an A style. Maybe a 1930's Gibson A-50. One of the maple back and side models. Or even a Strad-O-Lin. The couple I have owned have wider nuts.

    Thing is, a vintage instrument is going to have a very different sound than a mahogany Weber. Not better or worse, just different.

    If you would prefer new, besides Silverangel maybe see if Sonny Morris would build one with a wider nut? Played one Morris and was quite impressed with it.

    Although much more expensive, I would vote for a wide nut Northfield NF-F5S. I am a fan of that model. (Bias alert - I did own one).
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  25. #23

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    Thank you! the more replies I see like this makes me see my folly. I'm currently looking at an IV build kit, though it won't have a wider neck necessarily. I can at least afford it, and have some carpentry skills.

  26. #24

    Default Re: compared to a Weber mandolin.

    thank you! I'll look to see what I can find.

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    thank you!

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    Thank you!

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