Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: Octave mandolin and mandocello

  1. #1
    Registered User Nick Royal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    442

    Default Octave mandolin and mandocello

    When you see them, they look the same to me. How are they different?
    Both in tuning and sound?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    High Peak - UK
    Posts
    4,040

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Whilst I can’t ever remember playing a ‘cello, I would imagine that the difference is much the same as between a mandolin and a mandola - the OM being an octave lower than a mandolin and a ‘cello being an octave lower than a mandola.

  3. #3
    Registered User Jairo Ramos Parra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Colombia, Sudamιrica
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Music washes away from the soul the dust of every-day life. Auerbach.

  4. The following members say thank you to Jairo Ramos Parra for this post:


  5. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    1,867

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    octave mandolin is one octave below mandolin GDAE the open D is the same pitch as the open D on a guitar

    mandocello is one octave below mandola tuned CGDA or same pitch as a cello, the open D is the same pitch as the open D on a guitar

    the two instruments over lap the G, D, and A open strings
    "Mean Old Timer, He's got grey hair, Mean Old Timer he just don't care
    Got no compassion, thinks its a sin
    All he does is sit around an play the Mandolin"

  6. The following members say thank you to tmsweeney for this post:


  7. #5
    Registered User chris.burcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Abingdon, VA
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    To me, these also vary with ease of transition and playability for those who already know how to play mandolin. Octave mandolin is a big mandolin tuned exactly one octave lower - meaning everything is 'bigger' and 'longer'. The left hand reaches are longer and the fretboard is wider, but it is very natural and 'easy' to play all the stuff you know on mandolin. Versus the mandocello, because when you play all the same stuff there, it's in a different key. Plus 'cellos are a bit wider and longer even than an OM in the scale length but all of that can vary because, unlike mandolins there is a more range for those specs than on mandolins. Or less adherence to strict parameters. Mandolins can come in 'wide nut' or radius, but pretty much are the same on the fretboard. This is not as true on octave mandolins OR mandocellos. Soundwise OMs and 'cellos can be very close or extremely different, depending, given all of that variation and loose parameters. Just gotta go play them. I made a trek to a big music store and just played everything with 8 strings that wasn't a 'regular' mandolin. Unfortunately, that's the best and quickest way to answer your question. But hopefully my extreme run-on sentences and rambling helps a little.

  8. #6
    Registered User 5Guitars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Location
    Boston Metrowest
    Posts
    46

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    This graphic (from the Weber website) may help:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Family.JPG 
Views:	59 
Size:	97.0 KB 
ID:	209446
    Actually, now 6Guitars

  9. #7
    Registered User gspiess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    And if you really want to be confused, here is what happens when you put one of each in a dark closet:https://youtu.be/0lAmlLleozg?si=5CF3v8Dh2MBkBgne
    Being right is overrated. Doing right is what matters.

    Northfield F5S Blacktop
    Pono MND-20H

  10. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Apart from the tuning, size, and looks (my 1912 Gibson K4 looks nothing like an octave) I have some questions about origins. Historically I believe the mandocello in America* was intended (by Orville Gibson) to play the cello part in string quartets made up of mandolins, and that's what I do in the Oregon Mandolin Orchestra. It is tuned just like a cello, low CGDA. It looks, sounds, and plays very differently from my Trinity Octave. It is also a bit more difficult to play because of the length and heaviness of the strings. I started too late to ever get really good at it.
    *[Slightly different story in European instruments, including the 10-string liuto cantabile]

    I read bass clef (I'm a singer and choral conductor) and I always loved cello music, but never played one. So I do not think of the mandocello as a large mandolin tuned differently, I think of it as a plucked cello, tuned exactly right. So yes, if you "play the same stuff" on the same frets it will come out in a different key. But if you take the instrument on its own it can play anything in any key. I don't play much bluegrass on the MC, mostly classical and orchestral, but I can play Whiskey before Breakfast and Salt Creek right along with any mandolin in the same key--on the appropriate strings for a mandocello--not the "wrong" strings. And probably not as fast, but that's my old arthritic fingers.
    My point is the mandocello has a history and function all its own, it's not just a big mandolin tuned differently, any more than a cello is a just big violin. I have to admit I do not have the same background on the octave. A classical mandolin quartet intentionally mirrors the bowed string family: 1st and 2nd Mandolin, Mandola (alto clef), and Mandocello (bass clef). I do not know the origins or history of the octave mandolin and would like to hear from those who do.
    Jim

    Dr James S Imhoff
    Boston University
    Oregon Mandolin Orchestra

    1912 Gibson K4 Mandocello; Thomann Mandocello; Stiver F5; American? Bowlback; Martin 00016; Dusepo Cittern/liuto cantabile

  11. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    317

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    good question. in the nut shell, they are "same thing" or "completely unrelated", depending on your view.

    GDAE octave mandolin is a hybrid instrument, "mandolin and guitar in one bottle", you can play tunes, you can strum chords.

    CGDA mandocello is an octave mandolin, "add low C, remove high E", you can still play tunes, strum chords,

    (for a few $$$ more, you can keep the high E, and play a CGDAE cittern, but many people play 5-course citterns in alternative tunings. many old Gibson mandocellos today are tuned GDAE and are used as octave mandolins).

    alternate narrative:

    mandocello is a mandolin orchestra (circa 1900-1920, but still popular i.e. in Japan) member that corresponds to cello in bowed string orchestra. musician is expected to play bass clef music as directed by composer and arranger.


    (same Mike Marshall playing same mandocello in both videos)

    these days, the two narratives moved closer together. Apocalyptica, Rushad E., Natalie Hass & co liberated the cello from the back of the string orchestra (with the dog house bass following closely, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxpKSrhIwa8, tune by the sweedish band Vasen) and it is now cool to play tunes and strum chords on cello. (something mandocellers knew all along).

    or you can ignore all that and use a mandocello as a rock-and-roll axe. (Shawn Spenser, band Spellbox)

  12. The following members say thank you to mandocello8 for this post:


  13. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Disagree on a couple points; yes that's Mike playing MC with Catherina, but not sure who the MC player is in the MMQ; Marshall is on mandolin. Recently, MMQ has had Radim Zenkl and Adam Roscowicz on mandocello; Radim also played mandola on some of their events. Maybe somebody can ID the mandocello player in these MMQ videos.
    EDIT: followed the video to the end, that is John Imholz on MC.

    Also, I do agree with the second view, mandocello as an orchestral instrument equivalent to a bowed cello, and yes, very big in Japan. But we are raising American awareness and visibility of the big guy here on the Cafe and at CMSA events. We had 25 mandocellos a few years ago (pre-pandemic) at Normal Illinois, and we have played mandocello ensemble (that's a four part all-MC group) compositions as well as mandocello solos at these events. Mandoln Orchestras all over the US and Canada have mandocellos as part of the group. Apart from orchestral parts, there is serious music as well as fun tunes written specifically for solo mandocello, and I urge people to check out Mike Marshall's Bach Suites and Luke William Wright's new album TANGENTS for mandocello.
    I see plenty of entries about octaves, but don't know the history or origins; I do know that it is "somewhat unrelated" (maybe not completely) to the mandocello, beyond just the different tuning.
    Jim

    Dr James S Imhoff
    Boston University
    Oregon Mandolin Orchestra

    1912 Gibson K4 Mandocello; Thomann Mandocello; Stiver F5; American? Bowlback; Martin 00016; Dusepo Cittern/liuto cantabile

  14. The following members say thank you to Jim Imhoff for this post:


  15. #11
    Slow Learner Mandochemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Ventura County, CA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    The online mandolin lesson biz must be good. Baron always seems to have some really nice instruments.

  16. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    1,867

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Well there is such a thing as an octave violin (violect?), but I don't know how recently in history it first appeared.

    Mandolin Family instruments belong to the greater Phyla of Lutes (which are an offshoot of the much older lyre and harp).

    The variation on lute like instruments through out the centuries would be a thick book indeed, and one I would probably peruse often.

    Its highly possible a craftsman in Europe produced octave mandolins on occasion, but probably not naming it that.

    Finding that in a historical record is a bit like looking for a black cat in a dark room that might not be there.
    "Mean Old Timer, He's got grey hair, Mean Old Timer he just don't care
    Got no compassion, thinks its a sin
    All he does is sit around an play the Mandolin"

  17. #13
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    30,546

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    It is funny that no one mentioned the scale length differences. OMs usually 20”-23” and mandocellos 24 and often longer.

    Also in Europe mandola often refers to same as North American OM and is also called octave mandola. What we call mandola is referred to as tenor mandola and tuned CGDA.
    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
    Facebook
    19th Century Tunes
    Playing lately:
    1924 Gibson A4 - 2018 Campanella A-5 - 2007 Brentrup A4C - 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin - Huss & Dalton DS - 1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead - '83 Flatiron A5-2 - 1939 Gibson L-00 - 1936 Epiphone Deluxe - 1928 Gibson L-5 - ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo - ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo - ca. 1920 Weymann Style 25 Mandolin-Banjo - National RM-1

  18. The following members say thank you to Jim Garber for this post:


  19. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Garber View Post
    It is funny that no one mentioned the scale length differences. OMs usually 20”-23” and mandocellos 24 and often longer.
    Also in Europe mandola often refers to same as North American OM and is also called octave mandola. What we call mandola is referred to as tenor mandola and tuned CGDA.
    One more reason I was puzzled by the "they look the same" start to the thread. Also, I try to be clear about "American usage" because I know names and tunings are different in many European countries. Different historical developments as well, with names like Gibson and Monroe being very influential in the States. Going to a major bluegrass festival this weekend, I wonder how many players heard of Emberger or Calace. I remember someone asking me why people write things like "CGDA" Mandola and GDAE Octave. Seems like the best way to clarify what instrument you are talking about.
    Jim

    Dr James S Imhoff
    Boston University
    Oregon Mandolin Orchestra

    1912 Gibson K4 Mandocello; Thomann Mandocello; Stiver F5; American? Bowlback; Martin 00016; Dusepo Cittern/liuto cantabile

  20. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    317

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    @JI, thank you for sorting out the modern mandolin quartet players, and I agree with you on mandocello origin as orchestral instrument.
    @tms, octave violin is a regular violin with special fat strings tuned one octave below normal. requires minor adjustment to the violin, full reversible. sounds amazing, but acoustically is on the quiet side.

    Historically, I think it is the octave mandolin that is a mongrel interloper. For me, it kind of explains the variation in scale length and body type.

    Did anybody research and write up the history of the octave mandolin? Shooting from the hip, I would guess many possible inventors:
    - the first person to string a Gibson mandocello with GDAE strings
    - the person who saw an army-navy pancake and asked "can you make me a guitar sized one?" (was flatiron first to make pancake octaves?)
    - the irish crowd, "my greek bouzouki fell apart, make me a new one! sure, how about a large mandolin instead?"
    - James Jones in Virginia was building octaves maybe since 1978, why did he start, was there anybody before him?

    (edit) perhaps I should watch the oldest youtube videos to see what people played back then. I think on the irish side oldest would be the greek bouzouki in the 1970-ies, then nothing, just small mandolins.

  21. #16
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    30,546

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Interesting, mandocello8: I would add the the history questions whether the Regal Octophone, introduced in 1928 could have been used as an early OM. 21” scale it was advertised to play in multiple tunings one of which was octave tuning. Of course tenor instruments existed before that and I would guess that some folks might have tuned to OM tuning back in those days.

    I have a Calace bowlback mandola which IIRC has a 17” scale but was recommended for two tunings: CGDA or octave GDAE. I am not sure when the shop started to build those. Mine was from 1974.
    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
    Facebook
    19th Century Tunes
    Playing lately:
    1924 Gibson A4 - 2018 Campanella A-5 - 2007 Brentrup A4C - 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin - Huss & Dalton DS - 1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead - '83 Flatiron A5-2 - 1939 Gibson L-00 - 1936 Epiphone Deluxe - 1928 Gibson L-5 - ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo - ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo - ca. 1920 Weymann Style 25 Mandolin-Banjo - National RM-1

  22. #17
    Martin Stillion mrmando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    13,036

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    The octave mandolin is not a derivative of the mandolin. It's the other way round.

    The instrument developed in Italy prior to the Renaissance was called a mandola, and its closest living relative is the so-called "octave mandolin." Mandolino means "little mandola"; the bigger instrument was developed first. Yes, the mandolin is more popular but the octave mandolin is actually older.

    I'm not certain that Orville Gibson invented the mandocello. Calace and other Italian bowlback makers were big believers in the liuto cantabile, which is basically a 10-string mandocello; it wouldn't surprise me if they also were making 8-string versions before Orville came along.

    American builders probably should get credit for the CGDA instrument that Americans call a mandola.

    The mandocello tends to have a beefier neck than the octave mandolin — I guess that's because it has to stand up to more string tension.
    Emando.com: More than you wanted to know about electric mandolins.

    Notorious: My Celtic CD--listen & buy!

    Lyon & Healy • Wood • Thormahlen • Andersen • Bacorn • Yanuziello • Fender • National • Gibson • Franke • Fuchs • Aceto • Three Hungry Pit Bulls

  23. #18
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    30,546

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    The joys of nomenclature! The CGDA mandola is also called the alto mandola and the mandoliola. Sometimes even the tenor mandola though I think that usually refers to the GDAE tuned version.
    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
    Facebook
    19th Century Tunes
    Playing lately:
    1924 Gibson A4 - 2018 Campanella A-5 - 2007 Brentrup A4C - 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin - Huss & Dalton DS - 1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead - '83 Flatiron A5-2 - 1939 Gibson L-00 - 1936 Epiphone Deluxe - 1928 Gibson L-5 - ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo - ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo - ca. 1920 Weymann Style 25 Mandolin-Banjo - National RM-1

  24. The following members say thank you to Jim Garber for this post:


  25. #19
    Registered User foldedpath's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    5,268

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Quote Originally Posted by mandocello8 View Post
    Historically, I think it is the octave mandolin that is a mongrel interloper. For me, it kind of explains the variation in scale length and body type.

    Did anybody research and write up the history of the octave mandolin? Shooting from the hip, I would guess many possible inventors:
    - the first person to string a Gibson mandocello with GDAE strings
    - the person who saw an army-navy pancake and asked "can you make me a guitar sized one?" (was flatiron first to make pancake octaves?)
    - the irish crowd, "my greek bouzouki fell apart, make me a new one! sure, how about a large mandolin instead?"
    - James Jones in Virginia was building octaves maybe since 1978, why did he start, was there anybody before him?
    I agree the octave mandolin is something of a mongrel from the Classical music perspective. But of course that's just one perspective. Us non-classical OM players find plenty of other uses for it.

    As for the history, my very loose understanding of it is that several builders in the late 70's into the 80's like Flatiron and then Weber started offering them as something different. The adaptation of the greek bouzouki in Irish trad was a separate and unrelated (AFAIK) development.

    However! If we're talking about "big Gibson" style OMs, then the touchstone is much earlier with a 1904 Orville-labeled Gibson octave mandolin. Feast your eyes on it in this earlier thread from the Cafe:

    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/t...ctave-Mandolin

    I don't know if we ever figured out if this was a one-off custom order or more were made. I suspect a custom order because I don't recall any others showing up. So there is apparently a big gap between the 1904 Gibson OM and the reemergence of the OM in the late 70's and 80's. Was nobody building and playing the OM during that time?

    Anyway, responding to the OP, I think of the octave mandolin as the ideal lower pitch instrument for those who play "fiddle tunes" in the OldTime, Bluegrass, and Irish/Scottish trad genres, due to the GDAE tuning and a scale short enough to be playable with mandolin or modified mandolin fingering. I use my Weber OM for chord-melody arrangements of slower Irish/Scottish trad tunes like marches, "slow reels" and airs, and switch to the more nimble mandolin for the up-tempo dance tunes.
    Lebeda F-5 mandolin, redwood top
    Weber Yellowstone F-5 octave mandolin

  26. The following members say thank you to foldedpath for this post:


  27. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmando View Post
    The octave mandolin is not a derivative of the mandolin. It's the other way round.

    The instrument developed in Italy prior to the Renaissance was called a mandola, and its closest living relative is the so-called "octave mandolin." Mandolino means "little mandola"; the bigger instrument was developed first. Yes, the mandolin is more popular but the octave mandolin is actually older.

    I'm not certain that Orville Gibson invented the mandocello. Calace and other Italian bowlback makers were big believers in the liuto cantabile, which is basically a 10-string mandocello; it wouldn't surprise me if they also were making 8-string versions before Orville came along.

    American builders probably should get credit for the CGDA instrument that Americans call a mandola.

    The mandocello tends to have a beefier neck than the octave mandolin — I guess that's because it has to stand up to more string tension.
    Yes to all that, and I forgot I had read that historically the "mandolino" as a little mandola. I did not make that connection to the octave, but it's a good point. And yes, Gibson did not invent the mandocello, that's why I was careful about American/European distinctions. I think any discussion in this area needs to have separate threads and definitions for American vs European traditions. My point was that Gibson's K models were intended and marketed to serve as the cello in a plucked quartet or orchestra in the US and Canada.
    I doubt there will ever be a definitive and universally agreed on naming system for mandolins, any more than there is for musical styles. Foldedpath's comment is correct, it depends on your perspective; my dissertation was a study of how personal experience and level-of-expertise influence the way you categorize anything, from dog breeds to musical styles to 8 string plucked things.
    Jim

    Dr James S Imhoff
    Boston University
    Oregon Mandolin Orchestra

    1912 Gibson K4 Mandocello; Thomann Mandocello; Stiver F5; American? Bowlback; Martin 00016; Dusepo Cittern/liuto cantabile

  28. #21
    Registered User urobouros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Sunny PNW
    Posts
    343

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    I've always viewed scale length as the main difference between the various mandolin family members. The longer the scale length demands variations in playing syle from one to the other depending on the players' reach. I think the biggest difference with a longer scale length is resonance so that drives my playing style with OMs vs mandolins. For me, the longer bouzouki & mandocello scales are great for playing chords & shorter scales are better for speed.
    2020 Northfield Big Mon
    2016 Skip Kelley A5
    2011 Weber Gallatin A20
    2013 Collings Mandola
    2021 Northfield Flattop Octave Mandolin
    2019 Pono Flattop Octave
    Richard Beard Celtic Flattop
    And a few electrics

  29. #22
    Unfamous String Buster Beanzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Cornwall & London
    Posts
    2,907
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Just for some added context here are some early 1900s examples with their stats, from the "Bowlbacks of note" thread (running at 7388 posts so it would be cruel & useless just referring people there)

    Mandoloncello from the Monzino luthiery, maker Marino Gennaro 1911
    Part of the Castello Sforzesco musical instrument collection Milan
    Length 1145mm width 373mm depth 220mm. scale length 740mm

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	11855500-1311-4C4B-A700-BA2FAC6ABEE8.jpeg 
Views:	6 
Size:	27.1 KB 
ID:	209477

    Mandoloncello from the Monzino luthiery, maker Riva Severino 1909
    Part of the Castello Sforzesco musical instrument collection Milan
    Length 950mm width 311mm depth 96mm ? scale length 576mm
    Name:  8B226189-548D-4887-8664-FCAB15DBD568.jpeg
Views: 158
Size:  11.4 KB

    Lombard Mandoloncello ,no label.
    Thought to be from the Monzino luthiery, attributed to maker Marino Gennaro, approximate years 1900-1910

    Part of the Castello Sforzesco musical instrument collection Milan
    Length 952 mm width 322mm depth 154mm. scale length 570mm
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	F16A3D62-3DDB-477A-AB0A-4F62B4F865BC.jpeg 
Views:	7 
Size:	25.7 KB 
ID:	209483

    And an example of an octave mandolin from then:

    Mandola from the Monzino luthiery, maker Marino Gennaro 1906
    Part of the Castello Sforzesco musical instrument collection Milan
    Length 737mm width 259mm depth 167mm. scale length 415mm
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	982C5113-DF92-44EE-A068-9832F142818B.jpeg 
Views:	8 
Size:	28.8 KB 
ID:	209480

    Here's a mandoloncello in the style of Vinaccia (no proper provenance seen in the auction info, so possibly a later 1800s reproduction)
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	79F95B74-DE73-4C7A-ABFC-627C8C6FB392.jpeg 
Views:	10 
Size:	15.3 KB 
ID:	209481 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	CCE77F0F-1F94-4796-8ADF-A64AFA22935E.jpeg 
Views:	11 
Size:	43.3 KB 
ID:	209482

    As you can see the scale lengths and other dimensions varied quite a bit. Generally you can have quite a big window for each type.
    However the general extra bulk of the mandoloncello is clear.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Eoin



    "Forget that anyone is listening to you and always listen to yourself" - Fryderyk Chopin

  30. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Beanzy For This Useful Post:


  31. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    317

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    yummy bowl backs, thanks!

  32. #24
    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    North CA
    Posts
    4,901

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    Thanks for all the interesting posts!

    And to add to this thread, I've been using one of these as a mandocello:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	789px-Lavta_front.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	200.2 KB 
ID:	209497

    https://salamuzik.com/blogs/news/all...-turkish-lavta

    Turkish Lavta.

  33. #25
    Registered User Denis Kearns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    west coast
    Posts
    180

    Default Re: Octave mandolin and mandocello

    And when they are on the couch:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	A476B209-3596-468F-B158-FEC8530CC5D2.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	786.3 KB 
ID:	209535
    Left to right: all Webers - mandocello, octave mandolin, mandola, mandolin, and the Weber sweet pea (excellent for backpacking).

  34. The following members say thank you to Denis Kearns for this post:

    Alfons 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •