Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: New Trillium Cittern

  1. #1

    Default

    i met bob abrams tuesday morning and picked up my new cittern. black walnut with a redwood top. absolutely stunning and the sound is deep and sooooooooo resonant.

    bob is truly a fine builder and i would recommend his instruments to anyone- those who envy sobell owners need only play one of bob's new octaves and his citterns to stave off any SAS. i know from where i speak as i own a sobell zouk. i am seriously thinking about selling my sobell now as i cannot put the trillium down.

    kudos to bob!!!!! (he's a swell guy too!!!)

    i will post some pics this evening.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  2. #2
    Registered User otterly2k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    3,607

    Default

    High praise, indeed, Mary... pics pleez!!

    also...for anyone with $ burning a hole in your pocket, Bob has listed a new OM (also redwood top) in the classifieds....whee doggie!

    I had a Trillium for a while, and it was an awesome instrument...If it hadn't been too long a scale for me, I would certainly have kept it. Made a judgement call when deciding on a custom build, and I have no regrets with the Dean, but the other top option was to ask Bob to make me a shorter scale Tril'.... ah! the path not traveled...



    Karen Escovitz
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Otter OM #1
    Brian Dean OM #32
    Old Wave Mandola #372
    Phoenix Neoclassical #256
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you're gonna walk on thin ice, you might as well dance!

  3. #3
    Registered User steve V. johnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Posts
    3,863

    Default

    Congratulations on your new Trillium! Please do post some pics?

    I wrote to Bob A and confessed that I wasn't making a "serious offer," and asked if he'd put a pic into his ad in the Classifieds. I once had the Tril' that Karen refers to, just before she got it. It wasn't just right for me, either, but it was a truly splendid instrument. I'm damn picky, I know... <G> .

    I think that I'd like cedar/walnut better than the spruce/mahogany that I experienced, so I'd love to see what this one is like.

    Again, congrats, and best wishes to you and to Trillium Bob!

    (Psssst.... now... about that Sobell.... <GGG&gt

    stv
    steve V. johnson

    Culchies
    http://cdbaby.com/Culchies
    The Lopers
    Ghosts Like Me
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers1
    There Was A Time
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers2

  4. #4

    Default

    i have played both those instruments in the classifieds. the walnut sitka is a great combo. the octave has me tempted.

    the trilliums that i have played over the last year or so have been superb instruments. i've had the opportunity to play some older ones. these are heads and tails over the older instruments. especially the citterns. bob has made some improvements that make these the best octaves/citterns that i have played in a long while.

    to top it all off the octave mando has a James tailpiece!!!!



    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  5. #5

    Default

    Mary, congratulations on the new Trillium cittern. I've had my Trillium octave mando/zouk since '98 and absolutely love it. Bob's instruments sound wonderful and keep getting better as you play it in. What tuning are you using on the new cittern? And what's this about parting with a Sobell? Email me if you're selling it

    Seth

  6. #6

    Default

    seth, not sure what tuning i am going to stick with.........still feeling around. as for the sobell, the other half said to me tonight- "i think we should hold onto it for a while longer." for some odd reason he has a yearning to learn to play it. so selling it is on hold for now. it does not keep me from yearning for a trillium octave. but if you are going to be at bob's sunday i will schlep it along for you to see.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  7. #7

    Default

    here are some studio shots of the cittern:


    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  8. #8
    Registered User steve V. johnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Posts
    3,863

    Default

    Wow, that's gorgeous, thanks for the pix!

    So, does the redwood/walnut OM look like yours? I see that the fretboard looks to be the same width all the way up. Does the redwood/walnut OM have the same width all the way up?

    And you wrote, " bob has made some improvements that make these the best octaves/citterns that i have played in a long while."

    Great tease... <GG> What are those "improvements," eh? Do tell... <GG>

    Thanks,

    stv
    steve V. johnson

    Culchies
    http://cdbaby.com/Culchies
    The Lopers
    Ghosts Like Me
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers1
    There Was A Time
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers2

  9. #9

    Default

    steve, yes the octave mando looks like my cittern ( i was tempted to buy them as a pair). he has some pics of the two instruments for sale that he will be posting on the ads, but feel free to e-mail him for pics. i can assure you that the instruments are gorgeous. i will have to check to see if the fretboard is the same size all the way up. i hadn't noticed. as for the improvements, well, the citterns have a rod through the body from block to block that stabilize the neck to the body (many sobells that i have seen have cracks on the sides of the fretboard where the neck meets the body). you get a lot more resonance with that rod in there. the fit and finish on these instruments is exquisite.

    david surette played his barely days old trillium cittern at the opening night concert for the march mandolin festival we have in new hampshire every year. the sound was enormous and it was like watching hendrix play. the sound just jumped out at you. it was the most amazing thing i've heard in a long while.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  10. #10

    Default

    Mary,

    That cittern looks wonderful! Not sure if we'll make it to Bob's on Sunday, we're teaching at Fiddleheads all weekend, if we get home early enough we might.

    Seth

  11. #11
    Scott Furniss Furnman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Severna Park , MD
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by (otterly2k @ Sep. 07 2006, 15:02)
    I had a Trillium for a while, and it was an awesome instrument...If it hadn't been too long a scale for me, I would certainly have kept it. #
    Quote Originally Posted by
    I once had the Tril' that Karen refers to, just before she got it. #It wasn't just right for me, either, but it was a truly splendid instrument.
    It's working for me, so far! I think it has a happy home for a while to come. Thanks, Karen and Steve!

    Scott

  12. #12
    Registered User otterly2k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    3,607

    Default

    Glad to hear it, Scott! and glad it has a happy home.

    Stv... Bob seems to have heard your request, and posted pics to the Classifed ads...

    KE
    Karen Escovitz
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Otter OM #1
    Brian Dean OM #32
    Old Wave Mandola #372
    Phoenix Neoclassical #256
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you're gonna walk on thin ice, you might as well dance!

  13. #13
    Registered User steve V. johnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Posts
    3,863

    Default

    Mary, thanks for the new info! The rod thingie sounds really interesting...

    Maybe it allows lighter construction in some areas of the instrument...? I'd definitely like to learn more about it.
    Another thing that seemed characteristic of the Trilliums and some of the Fylde models is a big (at least large-looking) heel/neck joint, and as I recall, Abrams had a picture on the website of a hole through it for a strap string. That was
    a pretty interesting feature.

    Scott, that's wonderful news! Hooray! I really enjoyed that instrument. It's very instructive to really work out with an instrument that is excellent in so many ways and still then have to figure out why it just ain't right for me somehow.
    So that one taught me a lot of good things and I'm grateful for all that.

    Thanks for the heads-up, Karen, I hadn't looked over there today. Oboy, pix!!! Woohoo! <GG>

    stv
    steve V. johnson

    Culchies
    http://cdbaby.com/Culchies
    The Lopers
    Ghosts Like Me
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers1
    There Was A Time
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers2

  14. #14

    Default

    i see the octave mando is now on hold. anyone want to fess up?
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Gahanna, Ohio
    Posts
    27

    Default

    I notice that the 5-course Trillium is no longer in the New Instruments ad section. Does that mean it has a new home now?

    Randy

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Welsh Border, English side..
    Posts
    30

    Default

    That is a very beautiful cittern. COngratulations.

    I am really hoping to build a guitar/cittern soon; do you mind telling me what scale length it is, please?




  17. #17

    Default

    bob told me that it is a "guitar scale length". i am not sure, but that is 25.4 or thereabouts.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Golly, I know this post is 4 months later, but reading
    this string has gotten me REALLY excited about tomorrow's FedEx truck coming.
    Yup, a redwood/walnut Tril OM is on it's way here. I LOVE my Petersen,
    but am ready to be a convert.
    I play only eastern European gypsy music on the OM. I find
    it works perfectly in this genre'.

    Thanks for making me smile!

    Bob Nagy

    Petersen OMII
    Moon Cittern

  19. #19

    Default

    bob,

    that om is the sister to mine. they were built at the same time. i got to play that om- absolutely wonderful.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Hi Mary-
    Yup, she is here..and I figured it was related to yours.
    Well, such a "complex" sound. I will actually have time today to sit with it and take a good listen. My Petersen is what I play daily, so I have to sort of reset my pre-conditioned ears
    to "hear" the Trillium with a fresh palette. It is a very different animal. Build quality could not be better. Scale is perfect for me. Action, neck and intonation are perfect.
    I would call it a "recording instrument" rather than a "performing" instrument, as it's voice is slightly swallowed compared to standard flat-tops. Live, against one other instrument, fine. You'd have to mic it to prevail in a larger mix. I've found the Petersens to be the loudest overall and I can hold my own against an accordion and violin with it. Sure, it has a "simpler" sound though.

    So, with the Redwood top, do you think there will be a break-in? It's a rare top material and I have no info on it.

    At this level of craftsmanship, you are really talking about a "relationship" with the instrument. I'll just have to sit on the couch holding her for a while today...ha!

    I'm still in the approval period..but I think it's staying here. Any input would be appreciated.

    Bob Nagy
    Hot Springs

  21. #21

    Default

    bob,

    i think the more you play it the better it will sound. i am not sure that there is as much break in period with redwood as spruce varities- although rick davis who used to be the head of the ASIA luthiers group told me that it is more forgiving in high humidity.

    i was tempted to buy this one also when bob showed it to me. i think it is the perfect size. if you tire of it let me know.....right now i have a peterson level 3 22". i like my trillium cittern so much that i am about to return my sobell zouk to it's original owner (as part of a trade).
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  22. #22
    Registered User steve V. johnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Posts
    3,863

    Default

    My Crump's cedar top has changed... well... the whole instrument has, really. There's a lot of stuff that folks say about comparing cedar and spruce tops... I read all I could and ordered cedar... I can't really quantify a lot of what folks say, but here's what I have noticed.

    The cedar top makes a "thump," a transient that is very different to my ear, and I really like it. I reckon that the rosewood b/s complementing the top has something to do with that. The one thing that's said most, I think, is that cedar tops start off sounding more mature, and then change less, than spruce tops... Well, mine started out good, but I do think it's changed a good bit. it seems odd to me, but the trebles seem to have come forward more over time, while the mids and bass have changed less.

    The cedar seems to have a really nice -texture- to the tone. I don't think I've been able to overdrive the top, but playing from mid- to hard on it has a timbre that is very different. Not quite pristine, but not 'distorted,' just ... textural. Another term that I've heard a bunch about cedar tops is "warm," which often means that the highs are not really forward, or are rolled off a bit. In my Crump, the treble attack is not usually the first thing folks notice unless I play it with a light touch. I'd say that with most of the cedar topped instruments I've heard up close, the midrange is usually a bit more prominent, with the high and low overtones following.

    Now... Bob's Trillium instruments are a very different design philosophy from Phil Crump's, so I don't think that the two will ever sound really similar to one another. Bob's are a bit heavier and the ones I've seen have had harder finishes, and I think I'd expect the effect of the cedar top to be less pronounced in Bob's instruments than in Phil's...

    The Martin guitar guys used to say, "This is the worst this instrument will ever be..." and I think that probably applies to your new Trill', too. I've been around several, but no new ones, and those were all really loud. In a very good way. The one that I had and Karen had was almost too loud for me. When I played it in session, I really had to lighten up.

    I'm very happy with the Crump's cedar top, and when I dream about other instruments, I think more often about cedar topped ones than I do spruce. I really like the "warmth" and the textures that I hear from 'em.

    stv
    steve V. johnson

    Culchies
    http://cdbaby.com/Culchies
    The Lopers
    Ghosts Like Me
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers1
    There Was A Time
    http://cdbaby.com/Lopers2

  23. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Billings, Montana
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by (Yavor @ Feb. 05 2007, 10:03)
    Golly, I know this post is 4 months later, but reading
    this string has gotten me REALLY excited about tomorrow's FedEx truck coming.
    Yup, a redwood/walnut Tril OM is on it's way here. I LOVE my Petersen,
    but am ready to be a convert.
    I play only eastern European gypsy music on the OM. I find
    it works perfectly in this genre'.

    Thanks for making me smile!

    Bob Nagy

    Petersen OMII
    Moon Cittern
    So Bob, are you thinking about sending the Petersen to a new home? I would be interested. I have a Petersen Zook and really think I need a OM to match. Not sure the wife will agree though.

    Patrick
    PNB
    Sobell Cittern, Sobell Bouzouki, Petersen Cittern
    Alvarez tenor banjo, Model 4291 , Gold tone CC Irish Tenor
    72 Guild D50, Guild 12 string, Guild F30, Blueridge BR163
    numerous sets of bagpipes- most for sale, email me.

    "When you have the music, you have the friend for life"

  24. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Patrick-
    Well, in a word - no. I've had the Tril 2 days now and I have yet to really bond with her. I know this is in total contradiction to the accepted wisdom out there, but I still like the Petersens best. I play with an accordion and violin player and there is no way I could be heard with the Tril.
    It has a more resonant and richer sound, but a much softer voice. It is perfect for recording sessions, or mic'ed performance.

    Tell you the truth, I'd buy another Petersen (II/III) used if I saw it come up. This Tril is only a few months old, so it will break in a bit but it won't stray too much from it's sound now. Normally, you get a little cleaner sound in the lower-midrange area, some volume increase,more sustain and slightly less sheen overall with time. It settles in and has a more confident sound overall. I attribute this to the still movable molecules of lignin which hold the cellulose together in the wood. They line up in the paths of least resistance along the standing sine waves caused by the string vibration. (now I'm off track!)

    So, Petersen? Three thumbs up. I'll own her forever.

    Bob
    Hot Springs

  25. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Mary- Didn't see your post till now. This is all big fun for me. What a lovely group to be a part of...the OM gang.

    You still have a Petersen III ehh? I can only imagine what the Tril Cittern sounds like. It think the "rod" thing probably makes it significantly different from the standard OM. The Tril OM sounds like a refined coloratura and the Petersen like a young brash tenor.

    I Just love trading around instruments, so let's stay in contact! I'm going to open up a new question here.

    In tuning CBOM instruments, I have always "stagger tuned" my
    courses. The first string is flat of the note and the second string -sharp. I'd say I do less than a quarter tone shift.
    The technical term for the harmonic generation of two mixing fundamental tones is Heretodyne. These two tones generate the sum and the difference of their original frequencies making for a much richer tonal pallet.
    Have I been doing what everyone already does out there...?


    Bob
    Hot Springs

Similar Threads

  1. Sawchyn AO-2 vs. Trillium
    By BradB in forum CBOM
    Replies: 24
    Last: Nov-23-2005, 9:17am
  2. Sound of a Trillium
    By steve V. johnson in forum CBOM
    Replies: 1
    Last: Aug-18-2005, 10:52am
  3. Used Trillium on ebay
    By otterly2k in forum CBOM
    Replies: 29
    Last: Apr-14-2005, 9:37am
  4. Trillium, Mid-Mo, Fylde
    By steve V. johnson in forum CBOM
    Replies: 9
    Last: Aug-02-2004, 3:11pm
  5. Trillium OM's
    By otterly2k in forum CBOM
    Replies: 7
    Last: Jun-18-2004, 1:53pm

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •