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Thread: Must-have fiddle tune mando/tab book

  1. #1
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    Hey all, I know this topic in other forms has been discussed before, but i'm very interested in the Cafe's overall opinion on what is the ONE fiddle tune book that should be in every mando players library. Is there a concensus as to what is the "must have" book? If you could only own one, what would it be? I'm sure at least some would be as interested as me.


    russell
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  2. #2
    Registered User cooper4205's Avatar
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    Brody's Mandolin Picker's fakebook. it has years worth of fiddle tunes of every sort. also has a nice bibliography on where to find the recorded versions of the songs that are in the book.
    Wes
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    The "Fiddler's Fakebook", Oak publications. The Fiddle version is only notation, but has more tunes than the mandolin version. Jack Tuttle, an instructor at Gryphon music also has some very good books that have instrumental parts for songs.
    david blair

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    Registered User luckylarue's Avatar
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    I'll second the recommendation for the "Fiddler's Fakebook". It's a great resource and excellent practice for reading standard notation. I just ordered the Marion Thede book - check out Mike Compton's web site for a list of his favorite fiddle books.

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    Registered User John Flynn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by
    what is the ONE fiddle tune book that should be in every mando players library
    It's a trick question. A "mando player's library," should absolutely not have only one fiddle tune book! I agree that the Fiddler's Fakebook is a must have, though.

  6. #6
    two t's and one hyphen fatt-dad's Avatar
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    That would be the Mandolin Fakebook (unless you know notation - then I guess it'd be the Fiddler's Fakebook). I could be lost on an island with that book and my mandolin and keep busy for quite a long time. . . .

    f-d
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    Purveyor of Sunshine sgarrity's Avatar
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    Both of Butch Baldisari's books. A great collection of tunes.

    Shaun

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    Registered User Fred Keller's Avatar
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    I keep the Portland Collection nearby at all times. Not quite as comprehensive as the F's Fakebook, but certainly a great repertoire of tunes. Like the FF, it has a good variety of tunes: Irish, old time, Canadian, and originals. It mixes tempos up (waltz, jig, reel) and it has something the FF does not: a nice guide to the source of each tune.

    I haven't gotten the 2nd book yet but it's on my list.
    Lost on the trails of The Deep North

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    Since I read notation, I vote for the "Fiddler's Fakebook".

    But if you're tab dependant, its mandotab cousin "Mandolin Fakebook".
    Glenn Nelson
    Las Vegas, NV

    "Every day brings a chance for you to draw in a breath, kick off your shoes and play your mandolin."

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    Gilchrist (pick) Owner! jasona's Avatar
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    I also bought "Ryan's Mammoth Collection" and "O'Neils Music of Ireland". There are literally thousands of tunes in those two books.



    Jason Anderson

    "...while a great mandolin is a wonderful treat, I would venture to say that there is always more each of us can do with the tools we have available at hand. The biggest limiting factors belong to us not the instruments." Paul Glasse

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    Registered User dj coffey's Avatar
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    I have Fiddler's Fakebook, both Portland Collections and O'Neill's. So far the 2 Portland books are my faves....there are CD's that go with the Portland books (sold separately). Very worth a listen!
    Dotty

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    O'Neills, 1001 Gems, The Dance Music Of Ireland.

    Dave H
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    Thanks to everyone that has chimed in on the topic. So far it seems thay the FFB and the MFB are the top contenders. I hope that lots more voice their opinion. Keep 'em comming.
    Bulldog F #5

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    MelBay (gag!) has a book called something like "50 Classic Old Time, Bluegrass, and Celtic Tunes." That's not the exact title, but its close.

    The main reason I mention it is that the same book is available for mandolin, guitar, and other instruments--all with the same songs. This is handy if you have folks you play with so you can all work on a piece together. Many of the standards are in there and its good for about intermediate level pickers.

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    Pete Martin's books - Petimar Press.

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    I'm a big fan of Steve Kaufman's parking lot picker series. Butch Baldassari's books are favorites of mine as well.
    Tim

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    Registered User David M.'s Avatar
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    There is a good book by Stacy Phillips called something like "The Phillips Collection of Traditional American Fiddle Tunes" or something like that. had a lot of good tunes, some w/multiple versions, notated like the version sited. Lots of good old tunes in this one.
    David Mehaffey
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  18. #18

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    A great resource on-line for O'Neill's is below. Has the books in pdf and midi files so you can hear how they sound. Enough tunes to keep you busy at least one lifetime. Plus you'll learn standard notation too.

    O'Neill's in PDF format
    Palatable to a Goat: Music from Gregg Daigle and Don Grieser
    http://HillbillyChamberMusic.bandcamp.com

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    Registered User Fred Keller's Avatar
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    I'll 2nd David M's recommendation for the Phillips collection. It's only old-time material so you Irish (bluegrass, klezmer, etc) players won't get much out of it, but what's great--nearly unique--is that it's a collection of transcriptions. The tunes are taken from the fiddling of some great players, not standardized versions or jam versions.
    Lost on the trails of The Deep North

  20. #20
    Paul Wheeler
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    I have both the Fiddler's Fakebook and the Mandolin Fakebook. The MF is something of a condensation of the FF, and its tablature has some "translation" errors from the standard-notation source in the FF (as I recall, numerous wrong-string/right-fret instances which caused me to abandon the MF after only a few days of use). Tablature isn't easier if it's also incorrect. -- Paul
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    Registered User John Hill's Avatar
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    Don G., thank you for that link. I've been flitting about the net (coming hither to go yonder...) looking for & downloading various tunes and that just made my life a little easier.

    John
    There are three kinds of people: those of us that are good at math and those that are not.

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    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
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    Well TBAS (tune book aquisition syndrome) being what it is, I must have all the tune books I possibly can. I already have most of the above mentioned books and so I can weigh in.

    The crucial question is - What do you want that one tune book for?

    If it is to learn the tunes in circulation in folkie and ole timey jams, The Fiddlers Fake Book is the one.

    If it is to learn a lot of really great contra dance tunes in order to play in a dance band or pick up band at a dance - the first Portland Book is the one.

    If it is to learn the Irish tune repertory,and play in Irish sessions or in an Irish band, then O'Neils 1850 (the yellow book) is the one.

    If it is to learn a lot of cool tunes to play solo and in small groups - The Phillips Collection of Traditional American Fiddle Tunes Volume Two is the one book.

    So you see - just as there are reasons to have more than one mandolin, there are reasons to have more than one tune book!

    Good luck.
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    jeffD, Good question. I guess I am mostly looking for a consecus on the "ultimate one book only, desert island" fiddle tune book. I figured it would be an interesting exercise for Cafe members to give their opinions. THere are a lot of newcomers to the mandolin on the cafe, and I am sure they are getting a lot out of the most excelent responses so far.

    As for myself, 30 years ago all the fiddle tunes I learned were be ear, and playing in bands etc. Having come back to the mando now I would like to get a collection in book form. Also, I prefer tab. I can read notation, but it takes a bit for me. However that is because I am anything but the usual regarding reading notation. I was a violist, and the alto clef is ingrained into my brain/fingers. Now if there was an fiddle tune book written in the alto clef...hehehehe

    russell
    Bulldog F #5

  24. #24

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    If you can take the time to figure it out, there's huge tune collections on the net in abc format. Search for "abc tunebooks." You'll need the software to translate the abc text into standard notation, but it will also play it for you. It can be a little overwhelming sifting though all the tunes, but there are some sites for searching for a specific tune. Yesterday I found 111 Dusty Millers, none of them resembling the bluegrass tune we know as Dusty Miller. They were jigs and stuff in 3/2, 9/8, 12/8, and other odd meters. Interesting.
    Palatable to a Goat: Music from Gregg Daigle and Don Grieser
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    Registered User Manfred Hacker's Avatar
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    Hello there,
    Thanks for all the info in this thread.
    I have downloaded Neill's and bought the Fiddler's Fakebook.

    And here is my question regarding fiddle notation played with the mandonlin:
    As a general rule, if there are two eigth notes in a bow, do you just play DU or do you play hammer-on or pull-off.
    Hope this is not a dumb question. I am relatively new to the mandolin, but kind of a false beginner. More than 30 years back I played the violin for 10 years in school but never got very far as I lacked the motivation and stamina that I have now.
    Thanks for any comments.
    Manfred
    I have never let my schooling interfere with my education - Mark Twain

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